Rapid rescoring is a little-known strategy explained by credit guru Liz Pulliam Weston in her book, "Your Credit Score: Your Money and What's at Stake." Unlike credit repair services, which are almost always a scam, rapid rescoring is a legitimate way to improve your credit score in as little as a few hours – if there are verifiable inaccuracies on your credit report. For rapid rescoring to work, you must have proof that negative items on your credit report are incorrect.
Life is a search according to many philosophers and poets, but it has become a web-search today. Fast credit repair companies are raking in millions by providing non-refundable fees that contradict the legitimacy of the process. Effective credit repair is a process involving time and expertise. Countless consumers either fell victim to “great credit in a minute” schemes or purchased a “kit” with the wrong blueprints for success and are now feeling the pain and suffering from the fallout. Many customers who expected to be a lender’s dream in just a matter of days are now faced with the nightmare of a damaged credit file and a score sometimes lower than when they signed up for that magic cure. Newsflash – the man behind the curtain, is almost always up to no good.
Hybrid loan option: CommonBond offers a unique “Hybrid” rate option in which rates are fixed for five years and then become variable for five years. This option can be a good choice for borrowers who intend to make extra payments and plan on paying off their student loans within the first five years. If you can a better interest rate on the Hybrid loan than the Fixed-rate option, you may end up paying less over the life of the loan.
And many lenders won’t give credit to people with a history of recently missed payments on other credit accounts (with "recently" translating to two years back). Missing enough payments that your account is turned over to a collection agency is another sure way to tank your score, not to mention limiting your access to affordable credit – or make it cost more than it should.

Still, even if the math of a debt consolidation loan works out in your favor, your behavior may be the real problem. Paying off all of your credit cards and debts with a loan only shuffles the deck chairs around—you still owe money you have to pay, and if you go charging up those freshly paid-off credit cards again, those deck chairs may as well be on the Titanic.

Closing out delinquent accounts or those with a history of late payments can also help, as long as you've paid them off in full. Because history is important, if you do decide to close a few more accounts, close the newest ones first. The length of your credit history is 15% of your score, so even after you've paid down your balances, keep your oldest cards open. Be sure use these cards to make occasional purchases (then pay the bills in full), so the card company won't close your account for inactivity.

That is for you to decide. You do have to weigh the certainty that your credit score would take a hit (and some time to rebuild) against the advantage of a program that will allow you to make progress and pay off your debts. A bank loan is another option. You could check on the interest rate . . . but you should do this knowing you will not run up credit card balances again. Otherwise, you end up in an even worse situation than you are in now.


If you don’t address the exact cause of your bad credit, the damage is likely to worsen the longer it goes untreated. For example, if you’ve missed a few credit-card payments, repaying at least the minimum amount needed to change your account’s status from “delinquent” to “paid” on your credit reports will prevent your score from falling further. The same is true of collections accounts, tax liens and other derogatory marks — at least to a certain extent.
If you are a candidate for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you will need to complete mandatory pre-filing credit counseling with an approved credit counseling agency. The cost of this type of credit counseling session is typically $50 to $100. During this meeting, a credit counselor will go over your finances, including your debts and your income, to counsel you on your options.
The key to this strategy is obtaining more credit, but not using more credit. In other words, if your limit goes up $1,000, don’t go out and charge half of it. Think of the boost as a way to save money later when you apply for an auto loan, home loan or another form of long-term debt where a high credit score will likely result in big savings via a lower interest rate.
Capital One is an odd example of this.  I have read many reviews that state that after 18 months with stellar payment history and carrying no balance that users were told they qualified for an unsecured card but would first have to close the secured card (In order to get the deposit refunded) - or you can keep the secured card and open the new unsecured card as well.  A few people indicated they were able to graduate without changing the card and it was converted for them - but 95% of reviews speak to how difficult it is to get deposits back - even from them.
However, each model weights the information differently. This means that a FICO® Score cannot be compared directly to a VantageScore® or an Equifax Risk Score. For example, a VantageScore® does not count paid items in collections against you. However, a FICO® Score counts all collections items against you, even if you’ve paid them. Additionally, the VantageScore® counts outstanding debt against you, but the FICO® Score only considers how much credit card debt you have relative to your available credit.
Step 2: Tell the creditor or other information provider, in writing, that you dispute an item. Include copies (NOT originals) of documents that support your position. Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider reports the item to a consumer reporting company, it must include a notice of your dispute. And if the information is found to be inaccurate, the provider may not report it again.
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Account Information – Carefully check all accounts listed and make sure they are actually accounts that you have opened. If you find an account in your name that you did not open, contact the credit bureaus, explain the fraud and ask that a fraud alert be put on your account. Then contact the card-issuing company to find out more details about the account. The fact that it is on your report means it is likely that someone used your Social Security number in opening that account. Also be sure that the balance information and payment history for each account is accurate. If any information is inaccurate, you will need proof of the correct information and you will have to start a dispute with the credit bureau to ask for ratifications.

Transitioning from a secured to an unsecured credit card: The transition from an unsecured card to a secured card is fairly simple for the cards mentioned below, with many conducting periodic reviews of your account to evaluate if you can move to an unsecured card. And, when you’re transitioned to an unsecured card, you’ll receive your security deposit back. Another way to be refunded the deposit is by paying off any balances and closing the card — though we don’t recommend closing the account since that jeopardizes your credit score.


Another avenue to pursue to improve your credit score as quickly as possible is to negotiate with your creditor and credit bureaus to see if they are will to make adjustments. This can be especially effective if you have established a current strong payment record. In that case, a creditor can often be persuaded to remove previously reported late payments as a “goodwill” gesture based on your current payment history, and to encourage you to maintain the course.
Premier America is unique because it has the Student Mastercard® from Premier America CU that’s eligible for the intro 0% for 6 months on balance transfers, though credit limits on that card are $500 – $2,000. There is an 11.50% Variable APR after the intro period. There’s also a card for those with no credit history – the Premier First Rewards Privileges® from Premier America CU, with limits of $1,000 – $2,000 and a 19.00% Variable APR. If you’re looking for a bigger line, the Premier Privileges Rewards Mastercard® from Premier America CU is available with limits up to $50,000 and a 8.45% - 17.95% Variable APR.
That's very commendable of you to handle your daughter's financial problems that way.  I used to be employed as a loan officer in finance, but things have changed so much in the last 20-30 years.  I accomplished something very similar to her situation, but I started in the fair range on scoring.  I raised mine 204 points in less than 9 months.  Thanks for passing along this great advice and experience.
I know this post is nearly three years old but I was desperately trying to figure out how to raise my credit score a little faster than usual. I would just like to say that everything he posted I tried and it worked for me. I have raised my score 50 points in just one month! I still have a long way to go, but now that I know what to do, I see it only going up from here. 

You have a low score, so I’m going to guess you have some charged-off, unpaid or seriously delinquent accounts on your credit report. The damage to your credit score has already happened. What you can do initially is make sure the negatives reported on your credit file are accurate and not out of date. Look over your credit reports, and dispute any negative items that you don’t think are yours or are more than 7 years old. Once you have ensured your history is accurate, you can work on adding new, positive data.
How to use it effectively: The money you withdraw from your 401(k) loan should go directly to paying off your credit card debt. After your debts are paid off, payments most likely will be taken from your paychecks until your loan is repaid. If not, continue to make regular, on-time payments. While you’re repaying your loan remember to keep your job — don’t quit and avoid any actions that may lead to your dismissal so you aren’t subject to penalties.
We all want to get rid of debt. Debt is costly and can prevent us from reaching financial goals (or at least prevent us from reaching them when we’d like to). Some people consider credit card debt bad and mortgage or student loan debt good. The truth is that having any debt means you are financially beholden to a creditor and you can’t put your money in your own pocket until your obligation is met.
I to am rebuilding my credit for the past 2-1/2 yrs and to get it past 750 and most recently got added as an authorized user on my moms' credit card (more for using the card in an emrgency on her behalf than rebuilding my credit) and would like to get a possible clarification- If my mom misses a payment or maxes out her credit limit on her card that im a authorized user on, will it impact my score (currently 730)?
How it works: Once you choose the secured card you prefer, you’ll open an account under your child’s name. If your teen is approved, the bank will ask for a security deposit. Most secured cards require deposits of at least $200, but there are secured cards with security deposits as low as $49. That deposit typically becomes their line of credit. For example, if the minimum security deposit is $200, the line of credit will also be $200.
Nice Info, Well I did boost my score with the help of Patchupcredit@ Gmail com. I had my credit history smiling, my debts and bad collections were deleted in few days. I’m happy living with benefit, I can’t get rid of my credit cards lol. I really appreciate the help i got all for a few bucks i totally recommend his service for you who need to boost your score fast for a loan or something useful
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