I have had my identity stolen and when I became aware of this I was almost 7,000.00 in DEBT, so after getting many letters from the credit card companies that I did not apply for these cards and my information was stolen.  Along with a Police Report I  typed many letters and got the cards  removed from my credit report But, As this happened I watched my credit score go DOWN VERY QUICKLY, I was shocked I was the victim and my credit score just kept going down, down, down. Now I have POOR credit I did obtain 3 credit cards and always pay the card off monthly, Does this help me by paying them off every month or not?? But just a note KEEP YOUR INFORMATION THAT IS PRIVATE, PRIVATE IN A SAFE!! THE PERSON WHO DID THIS WAS MY X PARTNER OF 17 YEARS.    


“A good credit repair company will scrub questionable credit report items against other laws — like the Fair Credit Billing Act, which regulates original creditors; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which oversees collection agencies; and others that address medical illness, military service, student status and other life events,” Padawer said.
Some folks swear by setting automatic payments using their bank’s online bill-paying system or their creditor’s automatic-payment system. If you prefer more control, at least sign up for automatic payment alerts from your lender, via email or text. Then set up a place in your house where you always pay bills, and get an accordion file that enables you to arrange the statements by due dates. Be sure to time your payment so the check or electronic funds transfer will arrive on time.
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Check over your credit report with a fine-toothed comb: Verify that the amount you owe on each account is accurate. And look for any accounts you paid off that still show as outstanding. If something seems incorrect or you are not sure of any items, then it is your right to contact the credit agency in writing and ask them to investigate the issue and make an amendment. The Federal Trade Commission recommends sending your letter via certified mail and requesting a return receipt so you know the bureau received it. According to the FTC, companies typically must investigate disputes within 30 days of receiving a correction request.

With poor credit, you may not be able to get approved for new credit products like credit cards. Although you may still be able to take out an auto loan or a mortgage, you’ll pay a much higher interest rate because of your low credit score. Compared to a borrower with good credit, someone with poor credit can pay $50,000 more in interest on a mortgage. Over an entire lifetime, you could end up paying over $200,000 more in unnecessary interest just because of bad credit.

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