Step 1: Tell the credit reporting company, in writing, what information you think is inaccurate. Use our sample letter to help write your own. Include copies (NOT originals) of any documents that support your position. In addition to including your complete name and address, your letter should identify each item in your report that you dispute; state the facts and the reasons you dispute the information, and ask that it be removed or corrected. You may want to enclose a copy of your report, and circle the items in question. Send your letter by certified mail, “return receipt requested,” so you can document that the credit reporting company got it. Keep copies of your dispute letter and enclosures.


Step 1: Tell the credit reporting company, in writing, what information you think is inaccurate. Use our sample letter to help write your own. Include copies (NOT originals) of any documents that support your position. In addition to including your complete name and address, your letter should identify each item in your report that you dispute; state the facts and the reasons you dispute the information, and ask that it be removed or corrected. You may want to enclose a copy of your report, and circle the items in question. Send your letter by certified mail, “return receipt requested,” so you can document that the credit reporting company got it. Keep copies of your dispute letter and enclosures.
I would disagree with this option, as a credit analyst its my job to investigate credit and determine customer eligibility for loans etc... typically creditors do not look for a card thats been used 1 time for $15 then never used again this kind of credit is disregarded and or not taken seriously. When we look to approve a consumer we look at several factors and what that makes a large impact is how they make their payments, the balance currently on all their revolving and installments and the history of payments. if you only charge a tiny amount and pay it off its going to show no history and therefore not be a heavy influence. in fact if you can handle it it is good to sometimes charge the card near max but then pay it off super fast. yes this well temp drop score however. it will show creditor your applying for that you can handle larger amounts and that you pay them down good and fast. 
bad idea they kill you in fees and unsecured does nothing for your credit . I found a jewery store on line that has you put %50 down and then make payment on the rest . and they report it . unsucured credit cards are bad news they don't help just make the banks alot of money . for example the person said transfer to a better card and leave the old one open . yeah if you want to pay a bunch of monthly and yearly fees .
Each time you apply for credit is listed on your credit report as a “hard inquiry” and if you have too many within two years, your credit score will suffer. In general, a consumer with good credit can apply for credit a few times each year before it begins to affect their credit score. If you’re already starting with below-average credit, however, these inquiries may have more of an impact on your score and delay your ultimate goal of watching your credit score climb.
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