Rates can vary depending on where you live: The rate that is advertised on LendKey is the lowest possible rate among all of its lenders, and some of these lenders are only available to residents of specific areas. So even if you have an excellent credit report, there is still a possibility that you will not receive the lowest rate, depending on geographic location.
To have a good credit score, you need to have positive information reported into your credit report on a monthly basis. The easiest way to do that is with a credit card. Just try to keep your utilization low (although there is no magic number, VantageScore released data showing that people with excellent credit scores tend to have utilization below 10%). And make sure you pay your statement balance in full and on time every month. If you repeat this, over time your score will improve.
Calculated metric using data from “Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit May 2017” Percent of Balance 90+ Days Delinquent by Loan Type and Total Debt Balance and Its Composition. All Loans, from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Equifax Consumer Credit Panel. Accessed July 23, 2017. Multiply all debt balances by percent of balance 90 days delinquent for Q1 2017, and summarize all delinquent balances. Total delinquent balance for non-mortgage debt = $284 billion. Total non-mortgage debt balance = $4.1 trillion$284 billion /$4.1 trillion = 6.9%.

Getting a bump in credit limit on one of your existing cards has a similar effect as getting a new credit card on your credit utilization but is even quicker and easier. Another plus: While you may not get as much of a credit limit increase as with a new card, your credit score will also not suffer the new credit card ding and will benefit from the age of the existing account.
With these three factors in mind, figure out how much you can save on interest during the 0% APR window compared to your existing rates. Then, calculate how much you’ll pay in interest at the standard purchase rate on a new card over the time you think it will take to pay off the remainder of the balance. Compare these numbers to what you would pay in interest at your current rate(s).

Cardholders can benefit from an 0% Introductory APR on purchases for 18 billing cycles and an introductory $0 balance transfer fee for the first 60 days your account is open. After that, the fee for future balance transfers is 3% (min. $10). Once the intro period ends, there is a 14.99% - 24.99% Variable APR. You can benefit from a $0 annual fee and access to your free FICO® Score.
Harzog was a successful freelance journalist for over 20 years, writing for major national magazines and custom publications. She became so entrenched in the credit industry, that in 2008, she was approached by CardRatings.com to be a credit card spokesperson for their site. In 2010, Harzog then went on to become the credit card expert for Credit.com.

All credit scores are based on the contents of your credit reports. Any errors in those reports can cause undeserved credit-score damage. They can also indicate fraud. So check your reports, dispute any errors you find, and take steps to protect yourself from identity theft if necessary. In particular, look for collections accounts, public records, late payments and other bad credit-score influencers.
I've been with the company for 3 months and not going to lie i've been very skectchy to do so because of what my sister told me about lexington law that they were not doing anything for her so i was very skeptical the first month they removed 6 collections accounts i had which was not even my fault the second month they removed tax leins and now we;ve approached the third month and my scores went up from 480 -equifax to now 650   417 -experian to now 702 -   430- transunion to now a 714 they've been very helpful i am super excited, i had enrolled for the lifetime so that my scores does not drop again thy will be giving me credit coahing for a lifetime. My dad almost fainted when i showed him lol he was like  "can they fix mines too" he doesn't really need credit repair but i had recommend my friend who waisted her time with lexington law. You guys have to try them!
I was wondering if you could give me a little advice to help raise my credit score within 5-6 months. I have recently paid off all of my collection accounts and was told to get at least two secured credit cards, as I do not have any active credit. The only active credit that I have is my student loans because I am in school all deferred until 2018& 2021, current car loan which I pay on time and a credit card from my credit union (that I pay on time) but it only reports to one bureau (Equifax), bummer!! About a month ago a mortgage broker pulled my credit and my lowest score was about 540 the highest was 590, and he said I needed to increase my score but didn't say how (no advice given). Since having my report pulled I have paid off the collections and have obtained 2 secured credit cards. My credit cards have not been reported to my credit report yet and all of the paid collections have been updated so I'm not sure what my scores are as of know. I am looking to be able to be approved for a home loan in the next 5-6 months with good interest rates. Can someone please give me advice that can possibly help me to raise my score about 80-100 points in this time frame?  Also I would like to say that there is a lending company that will give FHA home loans with a credit score of 580 credit score in my area, but not sure if their interest rates are ridiculously high. Would going with this company be a good option? 
Taking out a loan should be a relatively seamless process. There are a lot of lenders to choose from, so conducting research to see which financial institutions provide the best — and worst — user experience can save you a lot of headaches. Browse each bank’s website to review customer service contact options, read reviews and search social media to see what people are saying about your top choices.
Many times, a credit counselor can offer insights into your financial situation that you may not see on your own. They may see obvious ways you can cut your spending that you may have overlooked, for example. Their extensive knowledge of debt relief options also makes them ideal mentors for consumers who need professional help when it comes to assessing their debts and figuring out a plan that will work.
Become familiar with the information contained in each of your credit reports. They'll all look very similar, even if you've ordered them from different bureaus. Each credit report contains your personal identifying information, detailed history for each of your accounts, any items that have been listed in public record like a bankruptcy, and the inquiries that have been made to your credit report.
If the amount of debt you’re trying to pay off is relatively small and you have a great credit score, a balance transfer credit card might be a better choice. Many balance transfer credit cards offer a 0% APR for an introductory period of time, which could allow you to pay off your debt without accruing any additional interest. This can help you save a great deal of money, but there are a few things you should know first.
Before you apply, we encourage you to carefully consider whether consolidating your existing debt is the right choice for you. Consolidating multiple debts means you’ll have a single monthly payment, but it may not reduce or pay your debt off sooner. The payment reduction may come from a lower interest rate, a longer loan term, or a combination of both. By extending the loan term you may pay more in interest over the life of the loan. By understanding how consolidating your debt benefits you, you’ll be in a better position to decide if it is the right option for you.
Although the number of bankruptcy filings since 2005 seems high, not everyone decides to file bankruptcy to deal with their financial issues. There are other options for consumers who find themselves unable to pay off their debts and facing multiple collections actions, and those other options might be a better choice for some consumers. These options include:

Your best bet is to call and ask to see if they can put you on a payment plan where you can afford to pay them (even if it’s just the bare minimum a month) or if they will possibly settle for less money. A tip: anything that has your name attached (banking account,utility bills, credit cards, anything you finance, student loans, medical bills, car loans, home loans, your apartment, etc) that you miss a few payments on or don’t pay at all can be reported to the credit agencies and sold to collections companies.
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