I applied at my bank and at a credit union and both declined me. My credit score was provided with a fair rating but then the reason was that the amount of debt between us was too high, roughly 10k. Therefore they wanted to see more effort put in first. We were told to reapply again in a few months time when we had that under control. My payments were always on time and so I dont know how I am suppose to show effort if that amount of debt is always going to be the same due to interest. Hope that made sense.
For secured debts, the value of the underlying collateral must be paid to those lenders, which can also increase your overall debt burden under the plan. And because the debts take several years to be discharged, the debtor is expected to maintain payments during that time. If they cannot, then they may find their filing dismissed and collections and foreclosure procedures restarting.
Besides imposing no annual fee, the card has other perks, like rewarding me with a $20 statement credit when I reported a good GPA (up to 5 consecutive years), letting me earn 5 percent cash back on purchases in rotating categories, and matching the cash-back bonus I earned over the first 12 months with my account. For me, it was a great starter card, but there are plenty of other options out there.
Otherwise, the advice you have given is great and works well for a quick boost but having the ability to remove lines of information from your credit history is even better because once it is gone, it can no longer affect your score. BTW - don't take my word or anyone elses for that matter, educate yourself! You can find either of the sources I mentioned just by Googling either of them if you want and I promise you, the more information you have, the better!
The earlier you find out about a credit report or identity theft issue, the easier it is to solve. To ensure that you find out about issues in the future, consider signing up for a credit monitoring service. Some companies, like CreditKarma, offer free credit monitoring. Other companies offer daily three-bureau monitoring and resolution services. You can learn more about these options here.
Traditional debt consolidation companies review your debts, income and credit score. If you qualify for a debt consolidation loan, they will discuss terms with you which will include the repayment period, the interest rate and the monthly payment. After you are issued a check, you will pay off all of your individual credit cards and owe one monthly payment to the credit consolidation company. One of the downsides of working with a traditional debt consolidator is that your credit card accounts are open and available for use. You may be tempted to continue using your cards and could wind up doubling your debt. Consider the following tips if you decide to work with a traditional debt consolidation company and take out a brand new loan:

Some lenders might be open to renegotiating terms with you to reduce interest rates, create payment plans that get you caught up, remove fees and maybe even forgive portions of balances. Just remember that if this happens, you may have tax consequences since forgiven and canceled debts may be taxable. Additionally, according to Albaugh, sometimes settling with creditors on your own requires a lump-sum payment, whereas bankruptcy allows for installment payments on a lowered amount.
Creditsweeps are done by companies or individuals who want hundreds to thousands of dollars upfront directly deposited in their bank account. (which is 100% illegal and against the credit services organizations act) Once they get you to pay they have you give them a power of attorney. they then use that power of attorney to file a FAKE police report saying your identity was stolen. In a very few cases this will work “permanently”. These are cases where its hard to determine there was a legitimate account. (ie. identity thieves don’t make payments on your accounts for months or years and then stop paying. Real identity theft involves someone getting a credit card, maxing it out and NEVER making a payment. If you have ever made a payment on your credit cards the creditsweep won’t work. What you are likely to see is 1 credit bureau remove all the items and then over a 4-5 month time period all the items come back one by one. (the other bureaus are notified but put off removing items until after the 1st bureau reviews it.
I have two credit cards, one from a credit union with just over 10% interest and one from Chase with 9.99% interest. I just asked the credit union to increase my credit line to $20k so I can consolidate the two, as I thought it’d be best to keep my credit union account. I have a credit card through Wells Fargo that has an $18k limit, but it’s zero’d out and I don’t use it. Will this hurt my credit score? It’s in the mid-700’s.
Don’t try to transfer debt between two cards of the same bank. It won’t work. Balance transfer deals are meant to ‘steal’ your balance from a competing bank, not lower your rate from the same bank. So if you have a Chase Freedom® with a high rate, don’t apply for another Chase card like a Chase Slate® and expect you can transfer the balance. Apply for one from another bank.
Anyone can join First Tech Federal Credit Union by becoming a member of the Financial Fitness Association for $8, or the Computer History Museum for $15. You can apply for the card without joining first. The intro 0% for 12 months and no transfer fee on balances transferred within first 90 days of account opening is for the Choice Rewards World MasterCard® from First Tech FCU. After the intro period, an APR of 11.74%-18.00% variable applies. You also Earn 20,000 Rewards Points when you spend $3,000 in your first two months.
Credit repair success requires a universal perspective. You cannot afford to become myopic. Many people become so interested in monitoring the removal of derogatory items (which, admittedly, can be very exciting) that they ignore other major opportunities to boost their credit scores. Did you know that a single maxed-out credit card can depress your credit scores by over one hundred points? Conversely, paying your balances down can create an equal and opposite effect of increasing your scores by that amount. Pay your balances down and watch your scores take off. You should allow sixty days for the creditors to update the balances with the bureaus.
If you have a high balance on a credit card and are only making minimum payments, start paying down the balance. It's important to pay down (or even better, pay off) revolving accounts such as credit cards. This will lower your credit-to-debt ratio (what you have borrowed in relation to what you could borrow), and is one way to improve your credit score. Paying off installment loans such as auto loans, student loans, etc. won't improve your credit score as dramatically.
A report by FICO® showed that younger consumers can earn high credit scores with excellent credit behavior. 93% of consumers with credit scores between 750 and 799 who were under age 29 never had a late payment on their credit report. In contrast, 57% of the total population had at least one delinquency. This good credit group also used less of their available credit. They had an average revolving credit utilization ratio of 6%. The nation as a whole had a utilization ratio of 15%.39
Capital One is an odd example of this.  I have read many reviews that state that after 18 months with stellar payment history and carrying no balance that users were told they qualified for an unsecured card but would first have to close the secured card (In order to get the deposit refunded) - or you can keep the secured card and open the new unsecured card as well.  A few people indicated they were able to graduate without changing the card and it was converted for them - but 95% of reviews speak to how difficult it is to get deposits back - even from them.
Once you’ve filled out the form and requested reports from all three bureaus, you’ll fill out some security questions and be directed into your report, one agency at a time. If the security questions trip you up, the website will lock you out of your report, but it will offer a phone number that you can call to get your credit report via mail. If you get locked out, request the report via mail.
Here is where it all comes together! Rapid rescoring can raise your credit scores quickly. Many of the tactics on this list are highly effective but can take 30 days or more to actually reflect in your credit score. But a consumer can utilize a Rapid Rescore in order to speed up that recalculation of their credit – and raise their score within just days or a week. With a Rapid Rescore, the credit bureaus simply recompute your score immediately, instead of at the next natural cycle date. Therefore, if you’ve paid down debt, added yourself as an authorized user, deleted collections, or added new positive tradelines, it will show up post haste. A Rapid Rescore is invaluable if you’re applying for a business loan, trying to get approved for a mortgage so you can make an offer on a house, or just trying to clean up your credit before a potential employer checks your report. However, you’ll want to enlist some help to take advantage of a Rapid Rescore, so contact Blue Water Credit if you’d like more information or help with any of these tactics!
The Discover it® Student Cash Back is our top pick for a student card since it has a wide range of benefits. There is a cashback program where you can earn 5% cash back at different places each quarter like gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon.com or wholesale clubs up to the quarterly maximum each time you activate, plus 1% unlimited cash back automatically on all other purchases. Plus, new cardmembers can benefit from Discover automatically matching all the cash back you earn at the end of your first year. Another unique perk is the good Grades Reward: Receive a $20 statement credit each school year that your GPA is 3.0 or higher, for up to five consecutive years.

Your credit score can be affected by consolidating credit card debt — but the overall effect on your credit score should be positive, as long as you pay off your debt. If you open a new credit product like a credit card and consolidate your credit card debt, your credit score may temporarily decrease due to the inquiry and opening of a new account, but it’ll bounce back soon. Your score can actually benefit from the increased line of credit you’ll receive from the new card, as long as you keep your other credit cards open. And if you are consolidating credit card debt with a personal loan, you should see a boost to your score because you are paying off revolving lines of credit. Also, by taking out a fixed-rate installment loan, your mix of credit may improve, which is one of the factors that make up your credit score.


Following the 2007-2008 implosion of the housing market, banks saw mortgage borrowers defaulting at higher rates than ever before. In addition to higher mortgage default rates, the market downturn led to higher default rates across all types of consumer loans. To maintain profitability banks began tightening lending practices. More stringent lending standards made it tough for anyone with poor credit to get a loan at a reasonable rate. Although banks have loosened lending somewhat in the last two years, people with subprime credit will continue to struggle to get loans. In June 2017, banks rejected 81.4% of all credit applications from people with Equifax Risk Scores below 680. By contrast, banks rejected 9.11% of credit applications from those with credit scores above 760.22
Harzog was a successful freelance journalist for over 20 years, writing for major national magazines and custom publications. She became so entrenched in the credit industry, that in 2008, she was approached by CardRatings.com to be a credit card spokesperson for their site. In 2010, Harzog then went on to become the credit card expert for Credit.com.
 It still could take a little time. I started from zero with a touch of bad but mostly no credit. I got a rediculous card at first with high interest and monthly and yearly fees. Soon as my credit built up with some payments, yours isnt terrible, mine was in the 5's, I was able to get a better card. Dont spend much of your available credit. REALLY try and keep it lower than 30% and your uliliztion will look better and help your score rather quickly. im my case opening a new account with a higher ballance and transfering my debt to it (15 months 0% interest but was a 3% fee to do it) saved a lot of money over paying a couple of cards at 20-24% interest. If you have a good utilization % then you might even close the old account but if you are looking at a big purchase soon then it may be better to keep it open. Either way, my closing that horrible card actually made my score rise because of the newer better replacement card showing up. Again mine was in the 5's so it took a bit for new expanded credit acceptance but once it did it is currently going up very quick and am almost 700's. Id plan on a year though if you have negative stuff but you are ahead of me with your starting score already. 
We have a budget and unfortunately have nothing of value to sell. I have to have a reliable vehicle to go to work and to take the kids to school. Can’t stand the mall, thank goodness!!! We make our own coffee. We save for months to have pizza or a family outing. We are very modest so we only have needs, wants went away when we had my kids. I am looking for a part time job but I want to have one day off a week to spend with my kids and thats apparently a problem for some employers. I’m not giving up and I will win this I just needed to see if anyone had an idea I haven’t already looked into. Thank you!
If you're hopelessly drowning in debt, know that you can't negotiate any lower interest rates with your credit card companies or creditors, or if the math works out, a debt consolidation loan may be a good decision for you. Similarly, if you're in serious trouble with high interest rates, high monthly payments (that you're having trouble with already), and too many bills, a debt consolidation loan might help. Combined with a debt repayment plan or credit counseling, it can be used to pay off all of your debt at a fraction of their original cost. If it may be a good time to strike, pay it all off, and walk away debt-free. Photo by erules123.
Once your cards and debts are paid off, will you cancel the credit cards? Sure, you get credit cards with zero balances and no bills out of the loan, but one of the biggest problems with debt consolidation loans is that they do nothing to change the behaviors that got you into debt in the first place. Instead, they add another creditor to your pile, and fan the flames of going into debt to pay off more debt. If you even think you might be tempted to use those cards again after paying them off, or if you're using debt consolidation as an easy out or way to avoid really looking at your budget, it's not right for you. The last thing you want is to take out a loan, pay off your cards, and then charge up your cards again—now you've done nothing but dig your hole twice as deep.
Mathematically, the best balance transfer credit cards are no fee, 0% intro APR offers. You literally pay nothing to transfer your balance and can save hundreds of dollars in interest had you left your balance on a high APR card. Check out our list of the best no-fee balance transfer cards here. However, those cards tend to have shorter intro periods of 15 months or less, so you may need more time to pay off your balance.
Many times, a credit counselor can offer insights into your financial situation that you may not see on your own. They may see obvious ways you can cut your spending that you may have overlooked, for example. Their extensive knowledge of debt relief options also makes them ideal mentors for consumers who need professional help when it comes to assessing their debts and figuring out a plan that will work.
With poor credit, you may not be able to get approved for new credit products like credit cards. Although you may still be able to take out an auto loan or a mortgage, you’ll pay a much higher interest rate because of your low credit score. Compared to a borrower with good credit, someone with poor credit can pay $50,000 more in interest on a mortgage. Over an entire lifetime, you could end up paying over $200,000 more in unnecessary interest just because of bad credit.
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