In general, you should try to keep credit card balances low. When you consolidate the cards you’re consolidating will have much lower credit utilization ratios, but your overall ratio will remain the same. However, the lower interest rate you’re paying during the introductory period means you can pay more toward your balance each month, helping lower your overall credit utilization more quickly.
Survey of Consumer Expectations, © 2013-2017 Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY). The SCE data are available without charge at http://www.newyorkfed.org/microeconomics/sce and may be used subject to license terms posted there. FRBNY disclaims any responsibility or legal liability for this analysis and interpretation of Survey of Consumer Expectations data.
Home Equity Loans and Lines of Credit: Before the 2008 financial crisis, this was one of the most common methods of consolidating credit card debt. The benefit of a home equity loan is the low interest rate and the ability to deduct the interest. However, you put your home at risk and tempt yourself with extending the term. Credit unions offer particularly low interest rates. You can visit your local credit union, or work with a national credit union like PenFed, which offers home equity loan interest rates as low as 3.74%.
Consolidating credit card debt allows you to develop an effective repayment strategy so you can get out of debt faster. At the same time, you minimize interest charges, which reduces your total cost and can lower your monthly payments. But debt consolidation is not a silver bullet. It won’t work in every situation and if it’s used incorrectly, it can actually make a bad situation worse.
It’s hard to know the answer because it’s impossible to know your exact situation. A credit score factors in both non-revolving (car loans or mortgages, for example) and revolving (usually credit cards) credit. Diversity of credit has an effect, as do on-time payments and the amount of credit you access versus your credit limit (under 10% is best of all, but under 30% is considered acceptable).

At this point, you will need to continue following the advice of the credit counseling agency you hired to help and remember the benefits of being debt-free. Life is a lot more difficult when you’re juggling credit card bills and other payments each month. If you want to avoid winding up back in debt, it’s crucial to remember how far you’ve come and how wonderful freedom feels.

With Chase Slate® you can save with a 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and a balance transfer fee that’s Intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. After that: Either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater.  There’s also a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months. After the intro periods end, a 16.74% - 25.49% Variable APR applies. This card also has a $0 annual fee. Plus, you can see monthly updates to your FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.

Since a good portion of your credit score is based on your ratio of debt balances versus your total available credit (called Utilization Rate – and about 30% of your score), a great way to improve your Utilization without paying down debt is by requesting a credit line increase. Simply call each of your credit cards or revolving debt holders and ask them if they’ll increase your total credit line. If and when they do so, your credit utilization ratio will automatically improve, and your score will rise accordingly. For instance, if you owe $5,000 on a tradeline with a $10,000 limit, your utilization ratio is at 50%. But if this same creditor increases your available credit to $15,000, your ratio instantly sinks to 33% – which is far closer to FICO’s ideal ratios! You may be able to achieve this with a simple phone call (and some convincing), and the worst they can say is “no.” Either way, it’s not requesting a new tradeline or opening new credit so your score will never go down.


When the bureaus and data furnishers receive the dispute and supporting information, they will then work with the credit repair company to determine if the item should be removed from your credit report. The major law dictating your rights when it comes to credit reporting is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, but it isn’t the only law on your side when it comes to credit repair.

Excuse me angry person commenting below my comment, I dont feel the need to prove to anyone that my review is genuine, the results im recieving are enough for me however, This is a platform for consumers like myself to share our experiences with other people ACTUALLY looking for credit repair. It honestly seems very odd to me that you targeted all Reliant Credit Repair Reviews and not the Clean Slate ones that seem to have quite a bit of likes and posts. Are you implying that their reviews are fake as well? look i think i speak for everyone on when I say if we want to leave a review about our experience we have the freedom to do so on this platform and if you dont like it please take your negativity elsewhere. Thank you. Ill be posting my review on Google and Yelp with photos for those who want to see my progress -Mr. Masha
The key to this strategy is obtaining more credit, but not using more credit. In other words, if your limit goes up $1,000, don’t go out and charge half of it. Think of the boost as a way to save money later when you apply for an auto loan, home loan or another form of long-term debt where a high credit score will likely result in big savings via a lower interest rate.
The best way to handle this is first pull your credit reports from the three major credit agencies – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion.  And this can be done free of charge once every 12-months through the site AnnualCreditReport.com. Go through each of the reports as thoroughly as possible looking for any inaccuracies, like – incorrect information on collections, judgments, balances, new accounts, and payment history.
If you have impossibly high interest on those credit cards, then do cancel them. It doesn’t help to have open credit cards if the interest rate makes it nearly impossible for you to get the balance down. In fact, banks currently have hardship programs, where they will reduce your interest rate TO ZERO if you agree that they will cancel your cards. Yes, you wll take an immediate hit on your credit score, but that will quickly improve as you pay down your credit cards, which you can now do because you don’t have those usurious interest rates to pay.
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