Credit repair can involve fixing your bad credit in any way, shape or form, but when most people use the term ‘credit repair’, they’re referring to the process of disputing errors on credit reports. You can go through this dispute process for free with each of the credit bureaus on your own. This involves filing a formal dispute with the credit bureau(s) in question either online or via snail mail.
To accomplish this, simply get a family member to agree to allow you to be an authorized user on their account. They should have had the account open for at least two years. Then, draft a letter to the creditor to put the agreement in writing. Make sure to define what percentage of the account you’re allowed to use and whether or not you’re responsible for payments on any of those purchases.
2. First Premier – The bank claims to want to offer people a second chance when it comes to their finances, but its fee structure and fine print prove the exact opposite. First Premier charges you a $95 processing fee just to apply for a credit card. Then it levies a $75 annual fee on the credit cards and most cards only come with a $300 limit. You’re paying $170 for a $300 credit line! The APR is a painful 36%. In year two the annual fee reduces to $45, but then you’re charged a monthly servicing fee of $6.25. And to top it all off, you’ll be charged a 25% fee if your credit limit is increased. Stay away from this card! Use the $170 it would take to open the card and get a secured card instead.
A credit card could very well be the source of your credit-score sorrow. But it’s also your score’s best chance at recovery. You can’t remove negative records that are accurate from your credit reports. So the best you can hope for is to devalue them with a steady flow of positive information. And credit cards are perfect for the job because anyone can get them, they can be free to use, and they don’t force you to go into debt. Plus, they report information to the major credit bureaus on a monthly basis.

Every time you apply for credit, your credit report is accessed and analyzed. Every time your credit report is accessed a record of this transaction is placed on your credit report and it is called an inquiry. Inquiries can drop your credit score by as much as 5 points a piece. If you are looking to get new credit, be sure you will qualify for the credit card or loan so you do not have unnecessary inquiries on your credit report. In addition, having a lot of new credit (10% of your score) looks risky to lenders, and your score will suffer.
Pay down current and past-due debts first. Don’t fall into the trap of paying off old debts by postponing payments of current debt. The late payment accounts are already reflected on your credit report and score. Keeping credit accounts current helps your score by having good credit sources that are older, rather than new.[12] When paying off past debts, explain to your creditor that you are trying to become current and ask for help. Your creditor might:
The Affinity Secured Visa® Credit Card requires cardholders to join the Affinity FCU. You may qualify through participating organizations, but if you don’t, anyone can join the New Jersey Coalition for Financial Education by making a $5 donation when you fill out your online application. This card has an 12.35% Variable APR, which is one of the lowest rates available for a no annual fee secured card and is nearly half the amount major issuers charge. This is a good rate if you may carry a balance — but try to pay each statement in full.
As you go through life, your credit score will fluctuate. How much it fluctuates depends on how reliable you are at repaying debt on time, especially credit cards and installment loans. When you use credit more often, whether it’s by taking on more credit cards, getting a mortgage, taking out a student loan or auto loan, your credit score changes to reflect how you deal with the responsibility of more debt.

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Once you have your credit reports, read through them completely. If you have a long credit history, your credit reports might be several pages long. Try not to get overwhelmed by all the information you're reading. It's a lot to digest, especially if you're checking your credit report for the first time. Take your time and review your credit report over several days if you need to.

The scoring system wants to make sure you aren't overextended, but at the same time, they want to see that you do indeed use your credit. 30% of the available credit line seems to be the magic "balance vs. credit line" ratio to have. For example; if you have a Credit Card with a $10,000 credit line, make sure that never more than $3000 (even if you pay your account off in full each month). If your balances are higher than 30% of the available credit line, pay them down. Here is another thing you can try; ask your long time creditors if they will raise your credit line without checking your Credit Report. Tell them that you're shopping for a house and you can't afford to have any hits on your credit report. Many wont but some will.

Risks: While a secured card can be a great way for your teen to build credit, there are a few potential risks. If your teen misses a payment or pays late, they will incur a late payment fee. Plus, they will also be charged interest on any balances that remain after their statement due date. That’s why it’s key to inform your teen of good credit practices, such as paying on time and in full each billing cycle. Autopay is a great feature that can help your teen avoid missed payments and interest charges.


Following these 6 steps people with bad credit are sure to succeed. I would like to add while paying down your credit card debts one option that may help you get ahead is to take advantage of credit card transfers. Normally banks will let you transfer your balance (they’re more than happy to take it) for a small fee. One word of caution however, is that this doesn’t really fix the underlying issue, which as Sarah mentioned budgeting and keeping on top of your payments will.

If you’re the parent of a teenager, you might wonder if now is the right time to help them open a credit card. It can be hard to decide if they’re ready to take on the responsibility that comes with having a credit card since you need to trust that your teen has the restraint to limit spending and pay on time. Generally, we recommend introducing your teen to credit as soon as you can since credit is such a large part of life as an adult — you need credit to take out loans, apply for a mortgage and even make certain purchases. Plus, it’s important for your teenager to learn how to manage credit responsibly so they can build good credit.
A credit score ranges from 300 to 850, with the highest numbers reflecting the best risk. If your score is below 600, you will have a hard time finding lenders and loan products for which you qualify. If you have a 720 score and above, you will generally have access to the best loans and interest rates available. The world of credit scoring is a mysterious one: the formulas are a closely guarded secret and have never been made public. If you don’t have a good credit score right now, you may feel helpless, not knowing what can be done to turn this situation around. There are actually a lot of things that you can do that just require a little discipline. We offer you a few tips.
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