Once received, the bureau has 30 days to respond. They will contact the original creditor or issuer of the information to ask them to verify the item. If it can’t be verified, then it must be removed. If that happens, the credit bureau will provide a free copy of your report so you can confirm the item no longer appears. You can also request the credit bureau to notify anyone who inquired about your credit in the past six months. And, you can ask them to send a copy to any employers who checked your report within the past two years.


Transitioning from a secured to an unsecured credit card: The transition from an unsecured card to a secured card is fairly simple for the cards mentioned below, with many conducting periodic reviews of your account to evaluate if you can move to an unsecured card. And, when you’re transitioned to an unsecured card, you’ll receive your security deposit back. Another way to be refunded the deposit is by paying off any balances and closing the card — though we don’t recommend closing the account since that jeopardizes your credit score.
This is one of the most overlooked credit repair secrets.  In an effort to make you less desirable to their competitors, some creditors will not post your proper credit line. Showing less available credit can negatively impact your credit score. If you see this happening on your credit report, you have a right to complain and bring this to their attention. If you have bankruptcies that should be showing a zero balance…make sure they show a zero balance! Very often the creditor will not report a "bankruptcy charge-off" as a zero balance until it's been disputed.

Every creditor has an official “Report Date.” This is when they send the information about your account with them to places like FICO and the three credit bureaus.  More often than not, the report date (aka closing date) is before the payment due date on your account. This means that they will report a higher account balance for that month than what is necessary…and this may lead to a lower credit score!
You'll probably have a limited amount of money to put toward credit repair each month. So, you'll have to prioritize where you spend your money. Focus first on accounts that are in danger of becoming past due. Get as many of these accounts current as possible, preferably all of them. Then, work on bringing down your credit card balances. Third are those accounts that have already been charged-off or sent to a collection agency.
Once you take steps to improve your credit score, keep checking your credit report to ensure that you take the right steps to get the desired credit score. You can consider going for a credit-monitoring service. There are companies that offer free services, and others give regular three-bureau monitoring services. This kind of help will keep you updated on your credit score.
If you have one of those letters we mentioned earlier that details your credit problems, you have some idea of what’s holding you back. Even though it may seem complex, as we mentioned, your credit score is based on five core factors: payment history, credit utilization, the age of credit accounts, mix of credit accounts and history of applying for credit. They’re not equally weighted, and this information will most likely vary between credit bureaus.
For example, assume you have a credit card with a $1,000 limit. It’s a rewards card, so you use it for everything. In fact, every month, you hit your limit. The statement arrives, you owe $1,000, and you send in a check to pay it off. But the credit card company is likely reporting the statement balance each month. So, it looks like you have a $1,000 limit and a $1,000 balance. That’s a 100 percent credit utilization rate.
When possible, avoid closing credit card accounts. The longer your credit history, the better your score. However, if you are very far behind in your payments, you may not have a choice. A payment plan may require you to cancel your credit card. If possible, though, keep your older accounts so that you have a substantial credit history on your side. (See also: How to Avoid Getting Your Credit Card Cancelled)
The secured credit card is a way to build and establish credit to obtain higher credit scores. If you found that you cannot get approved for a traditional credit card, you’re still likely to get approved for a secured credit card because there is less risk for the lender. The card issuer will report to the credit bureaus about your ability to pay the credit card on time and how you manage and use the balance.
Pay down current and past-due debts first. Don’t fall into the trap of paying off old debts by postponing payments of current debt. The late payment accounts are already reflected on your credit report and score. Keeping credit accounts current helps your score by having good credit sources that are older, rather than new.[12] When paying off past debts, explain to your creditor that you are trying to become current and ask for help. Your creditor might:
First a few things on credit scores: They're important, and you should aim to have a good one, but you shouldn't obsess over the numbers. Fluctuations are normal, but keeping tabs on your score will help you make good financial decisions. Watching your score could even help you spot identity theft, because an unexpected score drop could indicate someone is misusing your information.

Be punished for missed payments: Not all late payments are created equally. If you are fewer than 30 days late, your missed payment will likely not be reported to the bureau (although you still will be subject to late fees and potential risk-based re-pricing, which can be very expensive). Once you are 30 days late, you will be reported to the credit bureau. The longer you go without paying, the bigger the impact on your score, ie: 60 days late is worse than 30 days late. A single missed payment (of 30 days or more) can still have a big impact on your score. It can take anywhere from 60 to 110 points off your score.
Just as one example, the average age of your credit accounts is a component of this category. Let's say that you have four credit cards -- one that's a year old, two that you opened three years ago, and one that you opened 10 years ago but don't use anymore. Currently, your average credit card account is 4.25 years old. If you decided to close your old and unused account, however, this average would drop to just 2.33 years and could hurt your FICO score.
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Having bad credit is an unfortunate problem that many families face, especially in today's economic climate. Having a poor credit score can have a very negative impact on your financial health and can result in higher interest rates, loan application rejections, and more. That's why thousands of people have turned to credit repair companies to help fix their credit and improve their FICO scores.
Reputable credit counseling organizations can advise you on managing your money and debts, help you develop a budget, and offer free educational materials and workshops. Their counselors are certified and trained in the areas of consumer credit, money and debt management, and budgeting. Counselors discuss your entire financial situation with you, and can help you develop a personalized plan to solve your money problems. An initial counseling session typically lasts an hour, with an offer of follow-up sessions.
I know this is old, but seriously what a great Dad you are! You didn't hand her money and you didnt leave her to flounder. You helped her in immediate ways she couldn't do herself like adding her as an authorized user, but also helped her long term by guiding her, teaching her, and establishing a plan. Plus, sharing your thoughts has helped many others. 
You’ve seen the ads claiming to be able to fix your bad credit, but do credit repair products really work? Honestly, many of the companies are a scam. But the best credit repair reviews of services that have been around for a couple decades show that these companies know the rules surrounding credit repair and know how to best navigate those rules to either raise your credit score or give you your money back. That of course doesn’t mean that it works for everyone. There is no magical formula to raise your credit score in a hurry, but there are a few instances where the best credit repair services can help you give your score a deserved bump. We’ll look at the best services and then explain the instances when credit repair actually works.
Credit repair is legal under federal law. So, you can legally repair your credit on your own no matter where you live in the United States. Federal law also protects your right to retain legal representation to make disputes on your behalf. This means as long as you retain the services of a state-licensed attorney that you authorize to make disputes on your behalf, then credit repair services are legal, too. Just make sure a credit repair company has at least one attorney on staff that’s licensed to work in your state.

Only a portion of the people looking for information about how to fix their credit realize how close to the truth they really are. Even though they may only be looking for a way to raise their credit scores, the fact of the matter is that in many cases, they are actually in need of fixing something that is broken. The credit system in this country is far from perfect and because of it, millions of Americans have credit scores that are not accurate assessments of their credit risk. In a word, their credit score is broken. Fixing their credit is exactly what they need to do.


In my article on using Excel to manage your life How To Use Microsoft Excel To Manage Your Life How To Use Microsoft Excel To Manage Your Life It's no secret that I'm a total Excel fanboy. Much of that comes from the fact that I enjoy writing VBA code, and Excel combined with VBA scripts open up a whole world of possibilities.... Read More , I included a section on managing debt which shows you how to use Excel to pay down your debt using a snowball approach.
If you have a low credit score, there are many things you can do to improve it. Sometimes we don’t even realize that our credit report contains errors—errors that can be removed with a little determination and perseverance. Even if your score is low because of your own poor choices in the past, you can still take control of your finances and improve your credit over the long run.
While a recent late payment will damage your credit score, the effect of the late pay will diminish with time, as long as you make it a point to pay the rest of your bills by the due date. Having a recent perfect pay history can begin to overtake the effects of any late payments you may have had in the past. Your payment history makes up 35% of your credit score, so paying on time has a large influence on your credit score.
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