Of course, if keeping accounts open and having credit available could trigger additional spending and debt, it might be more beneficial to close the accounts. Only you know all the ins and outs of your financial situation, and like thumbprints, they're different for each person. Make sure you carefully evaluate your situation; only you know what can work best for your financial outlook.
Following these tips will not only save you money but also teach you the valuable skills necessary to maintain a good credit score in your future. If you have bad credit, don’t give up on credit entirely. Instead, be responsible and stay educated about your accounts and scores so you can successfully handle your own finances and find a credit repair plan that works well for your situation.

Getting negative and inaccurate information off of your credit reports is one of the fastest ways to see an improvement in your scores. Since credit bureaus have to respond and resolve a dispute within 30 days (there are a few exceptions that may extend this to 45 days), it’s a short timeline. Especially when consumers want to buy a house, get a new car, or open up a new credit card soon and don’t have the time to wait to build good credit in other ways.
The State Department FCU Savings Secured Visa Platinum Card is open to anyone, regardless of residence. If you aren’t eligible through select methods including employees of the U.S. Department of State or members of select organizations, you can join the American Consumer Council during the application process. There is no fee associated with joining since State Department FCU pays the $5 on your behalf. There is a rewards program with this card where you earn Flexpoints, which can be redeemed for a variety of options like gift cards and travel. The APR can be as low as 13.99% Variable, which is reasonable considering many secured cards from major issuers are above 23%.

Risks: Overall, a student card can be a great asset for your teen to have in college, but there are a few risks to beware of. If your teen overspends so much that they max out their credit limit, they risk harming their utilization rate — which is the amount of credit they use divided by their total credit limit. For example, if your teen has a $500 credit limit and uses $400, their utilization rate would be 80% ($400/$500). That’s very high, and we recommend keeping utilization below 30%.
Great advice! There is only one issue and I am honestly hoping this is just an unclear explation because I would be quite surprised that you got this wrong considering your line of work... Once a debt is charged off, it stays charged off. It can not be "re-activated", "re-aged" or "re-" anything. The law states that the Statute of Limitations (SOL) is fixed at the point which the debt is charged off and it stays the same no matter what. This won't change your credit score unless you can have that line of information removed from your credit report. A charged off debt stays a charged off debt whether you are paying on it or not.
If you have one of those letters we mentioned earlier that details your credit problems, you have some idea of what’s holding you back. Even though it may seem complex, as we mentioned, your credit score is based on five core factors: payment history, credit utilization, the age of credit accounts, mix of credit accounts and history of applying for credit. They’re not equally weighted, and this information will most likely vary between credit bureaus.

You might be used to checking out at a store and being asked if you’d like to open a credit card. While these credit cards come with really high interest rates and are great tools to tempt you into buying items you don’t need, there is a big perk to store credit cards: they’re more likely to approve people with low credit scores. Just be sure to only use the card to make one small purchase a month and then pay it off on time and in full. Unsubscribe to emails about deals and don’t even carry it around everyday in your wallet if you can’t resist the desire to spend. Read more here. 
If your teen is ready for their own card, a secured credit card is a good place to start.  A secured card is similar to a traditional “unsecured” card, except it requires a security deposit to access credit. Your teen can build credit by charging a small amount each month to their secured card and paying it off in full and on time each month. They can eventually upgrade to an unsecured card, and we’ll explain how below.
The Target REDcard™ Credit Card offers great perks that are sure to please frequent Target shoppers. You receive 5% off every eligible transaction made at Target and Target.com. The discount automatically comes off your purchase — no redemption needed. Other benefits include free shipping on most items, early access to sales and exclusive extras like special items, offers, and 10% off coupon as a gift on your REDcard anniversary each year.* Recently, cardholders received early access to Black Friday deals. Reminder: This card can only be used at Target and on Target.com.
Step 2: Tell the creditor or other information provider, in writing, that you dispute an item. Include copies (NOT originals) of documents that support your position. Many providers specify an address for disputes. If the provider reports the item to a consumer reporting company, it must include a notice of your dispute. And if the information is found to be inaccurate, the provider may not report it again.
How it works: You can add your teen as an authorized user to your account by logging in to your online account or calling the number on the back of your card. The information required typically includes their name, birthday and SSN. After adding your teen as an authorized user, they will receive their own card that is linked to your account. They can use their card to make purchases just like you would.
Transitioning from a secured to an unsecured credit card: The transition from an unsecured card to a secured card is fairly simple for the cards mentioned below, with many conducting periodic reviews of your account to evaluate if you can move to an unsecured card. And, when you’re transitioned to an unsecured card, you’ll receive your security deposit back. Another way to be refunded the deposit is by paying off any balances and closing the card — though we don’t recommend closing the account since that jeopardizes your credit score.
Radio, television and the internet are full of ads for credit-repair services promising to make your credit problems go away. It's not that easy. Be very wary of for-profit-credit-repair services. These ultimately just add to your expenses and, in the case of debt management services, may cause you to lose control of when and whether payments are actually reaching your creditors.

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Lexington Law is a huge rip-off scam. They tell you that they will fix your credit, they make very big promises to get you to sign their contract. You pay the monthly payments and getting nothing in return. I used them for about a year and my credit scores actually went down. We had a very sick child and had a lot of medical collections and because they inquired about those to try and dispute them it basically quote refreshed the debt thus making our scores lower. We were young and dumb back then. I recommend Dave Ramsey The Total Money Makeover he is a genius and a self-made millionaire he came from beans and rice and could now eat filet mignon three times a day and not think twice about doing it but he still don't do it he is very Thrifty and still is Frugal with his money. He saved us from Financial ruins and bankruptcy. His $15 book probably saved us $10,000, at least
Capital One is an odd example of this.  I have read many reviews that state that after 18 months with stellar payment history and carrying no balance that users were told they qualified for an unsecured card but would first have to close the secured card (In order to get the deposit refunded) - or you can keep the secured card and open the new unsecured card as well.  A few people indicated they were able to graduate without changing the card and it was converted for them - but 95% of reviews speak to how difficult it is to get deposits back - even from them.
Thank y’all so much for offering so much information! My wife is a veteran. We have really done a few doozies on both our credit reports. We have been trying to raised our scores to 750 and above plus excellent her score is 550, while mine is still in the high 500’s. (I think 529 currently.) I also have a judgement against me for a credit card. The judgement doesn’t show up on my credit report anymore; I assume because it’s 7 years old. I know it didn’t just “go away”. All effort to increased and eliminate all negative item on my report was proven abortive until a saw many remarks of how this credit coach had helped them "cyberhack005 at gmail dotcom". He did a tremendous job by helping me increased my score and remove all negative item on my credit report just few days after we fixed agreement. Thanks am highly indebted
Thank y’all so much for offering so much information! My wife is a veteran. We have really done a few doozies on both our credit reports. We have been trying to raised our scores to 750 and above plus excellent her score is 550, while mine is still in the high 500’s. (I think 529 currently.) I also have a judgement against me for a credit card. The judgement doesn’t show up on my credit report anymore; I assume because it’s 7 years old. I know it didn’t just “go away”. All effort to increased and eliminate all negative item on my report was proven abortive until a saw many remarks of how this credit coach had helped them "cyberhack005 at gmail dotcom". He did a tremendous job by helping me increased my score and remove all negative item on my credit report just few days after we fixed agreement. Thanks am highly indebted

First a few things on credit scores: They're important, and you should aim to have a good one, but you shouldn't obsess over the numbers. Fluctuations are normal, but keeping tabs on your score will help you make good financial decisions. Watching your score could even help you spot identity theft, because an unexpected score drop could indicate someone is misusing your information.

As part of the Consumer Credit Protection Act, certain activities are prohibited under the Credit Repair Organizations Act. Specifically, credit repair companies cannot require payment in advance for credit repair services. The act further requires all contracts be in writing and that consumers have certain cancellation rights. Since this is federal law, consumers in every state are protected. If you have been told that you can't cancel a contract with a credit repair company, speak to an attorney in your area about your rights under the Credit Repair Organizations Act.

We'll start with derogatory marks like collection accounts and judgments. It's not uncommon to have at least one collection account appear on your report. I had two from health care providers I used after having a heart attack; my insurance company was extremely slow to pay and kept claiming it had paid while the providers said it had not,  and eventually the accounts ended up with a collection agency. At that point, I decided to pay them right away and argue with the insurance company later, but both collections wound up on my credit report.
First a few things on credit scores: They're important, and you should aim to have a good one, but you shouldn't obsess over the numbers. Fluctuations are normal, but keeping tabs on your score will help you make good financial decisions. Watching your score could even help you spot identity theft, because an unexpected score drop could indicate someone is misusing your information.
Since your credit score is based on information in your credit reports, you need to see what’s on them. You are entitled to one free credit report per year from each of the credit bureaus and you can see all of your credit reports from the 3 major credit bureaus at once by going to annualcreditreport.com. Reviewing your credit report will allow you some insight on why your credit score is low.
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