If you find that a hard inquiry was placed on your credit file and you have no knowledge of it, make sure to contact the lender that performed the inquiry to see what it was pertaining to. If it is not accurate or you still have no knowledge of the inquiry, you should expect fraud or identity theft and should promptly alert the credit bureaus of the alleged fraud so that it can be investigated. Doing so may also remove the hard inquiry from your credit report, although it may take some time.
This last step is easy too! Our strategy puts the bad credit of your past further and further behind you showing the credit bureaus that you are improving your credit. We make this easy for you by hand selecting the right credit cards for you to choose from - the ones that will get reported to the credit bureaus and are easier for individuals going through credit repair to get approved with.
6) After your payment history, the next most important factor is the amount of your credit that you use. Pay down as much of your credit card debt as possible and avoid closing credit cards because what matters is the amount you owe as a percentage of your total amount of credit. However, opening a lot of accounts in a short period of time to increase your available credit could actually hurt your score.
Every time you apply for credit, your credit report is accessed and analyzed. Every time your credit report is accessed a record of this transaction is placed on your credit report and it is called an inquiry. Inquiries can drop your credit score by as much as 5 points a piece. If you are looking to get new credit, be sure you will qualify for the credit card or loan so you do not have unnecessary inquiries on your credit report. In addition, having a lot of new credit (10% of your score) looks risky to lenders, and your score will suffer.
FICO, myFICO, Score Watch, The score lenders use, and The Score That Matters are trademarks or registered trademarks of Fair Isaac Corporation. Equifax Credit Report is a trademark of Equifax, Inc. and its affiliated companies. Many factors affect your FICO Scores and the interest rates you may receive. Fair Isaac is not a credit repair organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. Fair Isaac does not provide "credit repair" services or advice or assistance regarding "rebuilding" or "improving" your credit record, credit history or credit rating. FTC's website on credit.
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