A major driver of increased scores is the decreased proportion of consumers with collection items on their credit report. A credit item that falls into collections will stay on a person’s credit report for seven years. People caught in the latter end of the real estate foreclosure crisis of 2006-2011 may still have a collections item on their report today.
Have you had one or more financial misfortunes over the past several years and now have a less than ideal credit score? If so, you're certainly not alone. Credit scores have been one of the biggest victims of the financial crisis and the recession. Unfortunately, that number can determine not only whether you can get credit and what interest rates you'll pay but they can also affect your insurance premiums and even your ability to get a job.
Use our sample letter for disputing errors with businesses (see below). Say that you’re disputing an item, and include the same information. Again, include copies (not originals) of documents that support your position. Many businesses specify an address for disputes. If the business reports the item to a credit bureau, it must include a notice of your dispute.
Credit scores are very specific to the individual. It is possible for two people to have the same credit scores, but for very different reasons. The only way to know what you need to do to maximize your credit score is to identify the specific items from your personal credit history that are most affecting your personal credit score. If you recently ran your credit with credit scores, review the factors.
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All credit scores are based on the contents of your credit reports. Any errors in those reports can cause undeserved credit-score damage. They can also indicate fraud. So check your reports, dispute any errors you find, and take steps to protect yourself from identity theft if necessary. In particular, look for collections accounts, public records, late payments and other bad credit-score influencers.
Of course, paying down your debts can be easier said than done. In fact, if you could really pay down $3000 or $4000 of debts quickly, you probably wouldn’t be having a problem with debt in the first place. But there is an alternative. You could contact your creditors and ask them to raise your credit limits. Of course, if you had a debt-to-credit-available ratio of 85%, you might have a hard time convincing them to raise your limits. Some will and some won’t. But what you could do and here comes the sneaky, little trick is to get what’s called a sub-prime merchandise card tied to a line of credit that would allow you to buy merchandise from a single wholesale distributor. The thing is that everyone who applies for one of these cards is automatically approved. The distributor becomes the one who is supplying the financing because it wants your business. Of course, you shouldn’t get the card just so you could start racking up more debt. What you want is a new line of credit that the distributor will report to the credit-reporting bureaus.
No one can legally remove accurate and timely negative information from a credit report. You can ask for an investigation —at no charge to you — of information in your file that you dispute as inaccurate or incomplete. Some people hire a company to investigate for them, but anything a credit repair company can do legally, you can do for yourself at little or no cost. By law:
A good credit repair company will first pull your credit reports from each of the three major credit reporting agencies to pinpoint your credit issues. Why all three? Because each credit reporting agency has its own “data furnishers” (aka lenders, credit card companies, debt collectors, etc.), who report your credit information to them. And there may be errors that appear on one of your credit reports, but don’t appear on the others
A credit card could very well be the source of your credit-score sorrow. But it’s also your score’s best chance at recovery. You can’t remove negative records that are accurate from your credit reports. So the best you can hope for is to devalue them with a steady flow of positive information. And credit cards are perfect for the job because anyone can get them, they can be free to use, and they don’t force you to go into debt. Plus, they report information to the major credit bureaus on a monthly basis.
After you’ve resolved the negative items on your credit report, work on getting positive information added. Just like late payments severely hurt your credit score, timely payments help your score. If you have some credit cards and loans being reported on time, good. Continue to keep those balances at a reasonable level and make your payments on time.
Once you take steps to improve your credit score, keep checking your credit report to ensure that you take the right steps to get the desired credit score. You can consider going for a credit-monitoring service. There are companies that offer free services, and others give regular three-bureau monitoring services. This kind of help will keep you updated on your credit score.
So if you want to raise your score in a hurry, pay your credit card balances way before the due date. That way, instead of reporting your balances that were due, as shown on your monthly statement, your credit card company will instead report your reduced balances to the credit bureaus (i.e. the balance left over after you’ve made your most recent monthly payment).
Payment history accounts for the largest factor affecting your credit score. If you are behind on your payments, you won’t be able to improve your credit situation. Try to bring all of your accounts up to date. If you can’t afford to bring everything up to date at once, you can contact your creditors and work out a payment plan. Be up-front when you contact your creditors, explaining your situation and letting them know that you want to pay your obligation. Let your creditors know how much you can pay, and how long you expect to pay it. In many cases, it’s possible to work out an arrangement that all parties can live with.
Access to credit and loans may come easier than you expect, but that should also be a danger sign. There are several lenders who are willing to provide lines of credits or loans to people with poor credit. These options are often very predatory. If you’re simply trying to rebuild your credit history and improve your credit score, then there is no need to take this offers. If you’re in desperate need of a line of credit for an emergency, but have bad credit, please email us at info@magnifymoney.com for a tailored response.

The difference between the credit utilization ratio and the debt-to-income ratio is that the credit utilization ratio is the only one that will impact your credit score. The debt-to-income ratio is used by lenders and can be very influential when it comes to extending credit which is why it also plays a significant role and should also be monitored as you would your credit utilization.
Having bad credit is an unfortunate problem that many families face, especially in today's economic climate. Having a poor credit score can have a very negative impact on your financial health and can result in higher interest rates, loan application rejections, and more. That's why thousands of people have turned to credit repair companies to help fix their credit and improve their FICO scores.
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Mortgages are secured loans that are given to first time buyers, homeowners and people who have bad credit. If you have poor credit, it will always be hard to get an apartment, to get a house, to refinance a loan, or to get any other form of credit loans, including even credit cards. ARMs can also be very helpful for assisting those with poor credit in purchasing a home for the first time.
There is no company that can wipe your credit report clean and remove all negative marks, no matter how much money you pay them. The Federal Trade Commission warns consumers about falling prey to such promises saying that, “only time, a deliberate effort, and a plan to repay your bills will improve your credit as it’s detailed in your credit report.”
Because MidSouth Community is a federal credit union, you need to be a member to qualify for this card. Membership is limited to people who work, live, worship, or attend school in the following Middle Georgia counties: Bibb, Baldwin, Crawford, Hancock, Houston, Jones, Monroe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Twiggs, Washington, and Wilkinson. If you qualify, you may be able to get a secured card with an APR as low as 10.90% Variable.
Great advice! There is only one issue and I am honestly hoping this is just an unclear explation because I would be quite surprised that you got this wrong considering your line of work... Once a debt is charged off, it stays charged off. It can not be "re-activated", "re-aged" or "re-" anything. The law states that the Statute of Limitations (SOL) is fixed at the point which the debt is charged off and it stays the same no matter what. This won't change your credit score unless you can have that line of information removed from your credit report. A charged off debt stays a charged off debt whether you are paying on it or not.

Going forward, pay your bills on time. This includes non-credit bills. Your missed utility payments and late rent payments can be reported to the credit bureaus. Because payment history is so important, establishing a reliable pattern is vital to rebuilding your credit. At the very least, you want to avoid reports that you are missing payments, or paying habitually late. Consider setting up automatic withdrawals in order to avoid missing payments in the future.


While a recent late payment will damage your credit score, the effect of the late pay will diminish with time, as long as you make it a point to pay the rest of your bills by the due date. Having a recent perfect pay history can begin to overtake the effects of any late payments you may have had in the past. Your payment history makes up 35% of your credit score, so paying on time has a large influence on your credit score.
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