Isolating your financial needs on different credit-card accounts will help you get the best possible terms on every transaction that you make. For example, you could get the best cash-back credit card for everyday expenses, the best travel rewards card for airfare and hotel reservations, and the best balance-transfer card for reducing the cost of your existing debt.
My Husband is a doyen. We have really done a few good on our credit reports. We have been trying to raise our scores to mid-800 his score is 519 while mine is still in the high 500’s. (I think is 536 currently.) I also have a judgement against me for a credit card. The judgement doesn’t appear anymore on my credit report, I assume because it’s over 6 years old. I’m pretty sure it didn’t just “go away”. All effort to increase my credit score and eliminate all the negative items on my report proved abortive until I saw good remarks of how this credit expert “DERRICK” had helped people. Here is his contact [DERRICKREPAIR@TECHIE.COM]. He did a monumental job by helping us raise our credit score to 826 and 814 respectively and removed all the negative items replacing them with beautiful tradelines. Just a couple of days after, we fixed agreement. Thanks am highly indebted Derrick.
This is easier said than done, but reducing the amount that you owe is going to be a far more satisfying achievement than improving your credit score. The first thing you need to do is stop using your credit cards. Use your credit report to make a list of all of your accounts and then go online or check recent statements to determine how much you owe on each account and what interest rate they are charging you. Come up with a payment plan that puts most of your available budget for debt payments towards the highest interest cards first, while maintaining minimum payments on your other accounts.
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