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Studies show that the majority of credit reports contain errors. Whether through clerical errors, mistaken identities, improper accounting, or simple misunderstandings, there are an estimated 200+ million Americans with errors on their credit reports. And in many cases, these errors are significant. As many as 25% of all credit reports contain errors serious enough to cause someone to be denied on a credit application.
Pay off your debt instead of repeatedly transferring it to new accounts. Contact the debt collector listed on your credit report to see if they’d be willing to stop reporting the debt to each major credit bureau (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) in exchange for full payment. This technically violates some of the collectors’ agreements with the credit bureaus, so it may be a non-starter, but it never hurts to try.

In addition to a cashback program, this card provides valuable credit resources such as free access to your FICO® Score and a Credit Resource Center — just note these services are available whether you’re a cardholder or not. Discover also takes the guesswork out of wondering when you’re ready for an unsecured card (aka a regular credit card) by performing automatic monthly account reviews, starting at eight months of card membership.
Companies that want you to lie about credit history or create a new credit identity can get you into legal trouble. Companies that provide “new” identifying information use stolen Social Security numbers, and if you use this number then you are committing fraud. Likewise using an Employee Identification Number or Credit Profile Number provided by these companies is a crime. Rather than committing fraud, take the steps below to improve credit on your own.
If you have a trustworthy family member in good financial standing, it’s possible that you can “piggyback” on their credit in order to improve your FICO score.  All you need to do is become an authorized user on their account. This is especially helpful for anyone who has little to know credit history and is looking to build up their good standing quickly.

Capital One is an odd example of this.  I have read many reviews that state that after 18 months with stellar payment history and carrying no balance that users were told they qualified for an unsecured card but would first have to close the secured card (In order to get the deposit refunded) - or you can keep the secured card and open the new unsecured card as well.  A few people indicated they were able to graduate without changing the card and it was converted for them - but 95% of reviews speak to how difficult it is to get deposits back - even from them.
If you  do not know anything about credit, you will not be sure if the company actually knows what they are doing. You will want to ask about the factors that contribute to a credit rating.  Inquire about age of open credit lines, hard credit inquiries, and the percentage of on time payments. A reputable credit repair company will not only know the right answers, but also how to fix them. 
Once you’ve confirmed the accuracy of your credit reports, you can begin working on the mistakes that you’re responsible for. One easy way to pinpoint your credit-score weaknesses is to sign up for a free WalletHub account. Your Credit Analysis will include a grade for each component of your latest credit score as well as personalized advice for how to improve problem areas.
We all know that good credit is important, but most people struggle from time to time with too much debt, loss of income, or other financial emergencies. Collection agencies start entering the picture when payments are late or incomplete. People often file bankruptcy hoping for a new start, only to find their future credit is negatively affected for seven or more years. Understanding how to repair your credit is a far better alternative emotionally and financially.
Maybe you have never seen your credit score or haven’t seen it recently. If this is the case, you should get it immediately. The score that your lenders use when deciding whether to give you credit is called your FICO score. The only way you can get it is on the site www.myfico.com where you will either have to pay $19.95 or sign up for a free trial of the company’s Score Watch program in which case you will get it free. However, there are other options. The site www.CreditKarma.com will give you your credit score free but it won’t be your true FICO score. This includes your credit score, a way to monitor your credit health, plus the ability to track your progress against your credit goals. It’s also possible to get your credit score from the three credit reporting bureaus – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion – though you may have to jump through some hoops in order to get it free. And again, this will not be your true FICO score.
Reducing your balances on credit cards and other revolving credit accounts is likely the better option to improve your credit utilization rate, and, subsequently, your credit scores. Consistently making on-time payments against your debt will also help you build a positive credit history, which can have additional benefits for your credit history and, by extension, your credit scores, too.
To accomplish this, simply get a family member to agree to allow you to be an authorized user on their account. They should have had the account open for at least two years. Then, draft a letter to the creditor to put the agreement in writing. Make sure to define what percentage of the account you’re allowed to use and whether or not you’re responsible for payments on any of those purchases.
Since your credit score is based on information in your credit reports, you need to see what’s on them. You are entitled to one free credit report per year from each of the credit bureaus and you can see all of your credit reports from the 3 major credit bureaus at once by going to annualcreditreport.com. Reviewing your credit report will allow you some insight on why your credit score is low.
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