By the way, don’t use a credit card for a big bill if you plan to carry a balance. The compound interest will create an ugly pile of debt pretty quickly. Credit cards should never be used as a long-term loan unless you have a card with a zero percent introductory APR on purchases. But even then, you have to be mindful of the balance on the card and make sure you can pay the bill off before the intro period ends.
Have you had one or more financial misfortunes over the past several years and now have a less than ideal credit score? If so, you're certainly not alone. Credit scores have been one of the biggest victims of the financial crisis and the recession. Unfortunately, that number can determine not only whether you can get credit and what interest rates you'll pay but they can also affect your insurance premiums and even your ability to get a job.
Serious financial distress can have a lasting impact on your credit. Chapter 7 bankruptcy penalties on your credit report stick around for 10 years. Foreclosure, Chapter 13 bankruptcy and collection accounts remain for 7 years. And if your financial distress led to tax debt, unpaid tax liens can haunt you up to 15 years. But no one wants to wait that long to rebuild their credit. Are you just supposed to put your life on hold?
People get into trouble financially by overextending themselves: taking on too much debt or running up credit cards. When this happens, it becomes difficult to keep one’s head above water and payments become late or even missed and defaulted. Even one late payment can sink a credit score by up to 100 points. Evaluate your financial situation to make sure you can afford any new purchases or loans and make sure you have enough savings to whether any crisis.
It doesn’t cost anything to dispute mistakes or outdated items on your credit report. Both the credit reporting company and the information provider (the person, company, or organization that provides information about you to a credit reporting company) are responsible for correcting inaccurate or incomplete information in your report. To take advantage of all your rights, contact both the credit reporting company and the information provider.
Credit utilization is the second most important factor in credit score calculations – it’s 30% of your score. It measures the amount of debt you currently hold relative to your total available credit limit. So, if you have $500 in balances and a $5,000 total credit limit, your utilization ratio is 10%. Any ratio higher than 10% starts to drag down your score. That means, maintaining zero balances overall is good for your credit. It also allows you to use credit cards without incurring any interest charges!
Rent payments are not included in your credit reports unless a special allowance is made to include them. In most cases, rent along with utility payments, never appear on your reports. So, a missed rent payment won’t negatively impact your credit. Court judgments, such as unpaid child support, collection accounts and tax liens all appear as public records in your credit report.a) Missed rent payments
Unlike other types of credit, even people with deep subprime credit scores usually qualify to open a secured credit card. However, credit card use among people with poor credit scores is still near an all-time low. In the last decade, credit card use among deep subprime borrowers fell 16.7%. Today, just over 50% of deep subprime borrowers have credit card accounts.30
Age of credit matters to your credit report. Interest rates matter to your bank account. If you have $100 a month to put toward paying down balances (over and above the required monthly payments, of course), focus on paying off high interest accounts. Then prioritize those by the age of the account. Pay off the newest ones first; that way you'll increase the average length of credit, which should help your score, but you'll also be able to more quickly avoid paying relatively high interest.
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Most companies offer a free evaluation to answer any questions you have. Use this to your advantage to get a feel for the company and make sure they’re the right fit. If you don’t get a good read, thank them for their time and say you need some time to decide. Then you can continue to research your options and talk to other companies. Don’t make a decision unless you feel comfortable.
By co-signing, you agreed to be the backup payer on the account in case the primary folks defaulted (as it appears that they did). If the debt is past due by six years, check your state's Statute of Limitations for debt collection - many states only give creditors 3-4 years to collect on a debt, after which point they cannot bring you to court. A Partial payment will re-set this clock. You may also hit the 7 year limit for how long it can stay on your report (7 years from the date it was first past due with the cable company).
The best part about Lexington Law is that it is an actual law firm that specializes in credit law, which means they know what they are doing when dealing with lenders. It also has an “A” rating from the BBB, and has been around longer than most other credit repair services. Lexington Law is on the cheaper end at $59.95 a month, with a $99.95 initial fee, which includes all of the bells and whistles that come along with their credit repair plan, including a guarantee.
Having bad credit is an unfortunate problem that many families face, especially in today's economic climate. Having a poor credit score can have a very negative impact on your financial health and can result in higher interest rates, loan application rejections, and more. That's why thousands of people have turned to credit repair companies to help fix their credit and improve their FICO scores.
All credit scores are based on the contents of your credit reports. Any errors in those reports can cause undeserved credit-score damage. They can also indicate fraud. So check your reports, dispute any errors you find, and take steps to protect yourself from identity theft if necessary. In particular, look for collections accounts, public records, late payments and other bad credit-score influencers.
If you’re going to be hiring one of these services, you probably want to know what you’ll be receiving for your money – right?  Companies that claim to help fix your credit should be completely upfront with what they can and can't do for your situation.  A good company can remove negative items from your credit report and help improve your FICO score, making it easier to obtain a home, vehicle, mortgage, or insurance.
Pay off your debt instead of repeatedly transferring it to new accounts. Contact the debt collector listed on your credit report to see if they’d be willing to stop reporting the debt to each major credit bureau (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) in exchange for full payment. This technically violates some of the collectors’ agreements with the credit bureaus, so it may be a non-starter, but it never hurts to try.

While a recent late payment will damage your credit score, the effect of the late pay will diminish with time, as long as you make it a point to pay the rest of your bills by the due date. Having a recent perfect pay history can begin to overtake the effects of any late payments you may have had in the past. Your payment history makes up 35% of your credit score, so paying on time has a large influence on your credit score.
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