The Credit Advice pages of the Site may contain messages submitted by users over whom Credit Karma has no control. Credit Karma cannot guarantee the accuracy, integrity or quality of any such messages. Some users may post messages that are misleading, untrue or offensive. You must bear all risk associated with your use of the Credit Advice pages and should not rely on messages in making (or refraining from making) any specific financial or other decisions.
bad idea they kill you in fees and unsecured does nothing for your credit . I found a jewery store on line that has you put %50 down and then make payment on the rest . and they report it . unsucured credit cards are bad news they don't help just make the banks alot of money . for example the person said transfer to a better card and leave the old one open . yeah if you want to pay a bunch of monthly and yearly fees .
You cannot sign up for new credit cards, nor can you use the ones you have. While it may sound unreasonable to bar you from using credit, the point of your debt management plan is helping you dig your way out. “The last thing you want to be doing is running up more high-interest debt on the side,” said McClary. “You’re not doing yourself any favors in that situation.”
If I shop around for a balance transfer credit card, my score will get crushed: FALSE! If your score does decline, it probably will not decline by much. You can expect 10-20 points per credit application. But, remember: you apply for a balance transfer to help reduce your balance faster. When you open a new credit card and transfer your balance, then you will be able to:
Just wanted to say our loan experience with you has been fantastic! The process was by far the easiest and close to the quickest loan process I have ever gone through. We had very good credit before but now it’s "exceptional" according to FICO and I think the changes we made by consolidating debt using LightStream made all the difference. I rarely write things like this but really have been amazed and thrilled with your company. It actually feels unbelievable; not sure how you all did it but somehow you designed an incredible experience and I look forward to borrowing from you again.
I have had my identity stolen and when I became aware of this I was almost 7,000.00 in DEBT, so after getting many letters from the credit card companies that I did not apply for these cards and my information was stolen.  Along with a Police Report I  typed many letters and got the cards  removed from my credit report But, As this happened I watched my credit score go DOWN VERY QUICKLY, I was shocked I was the victim and my credit score just kept going down, down, down. Now I have POOR credit I did obtain 3 credit cards and always pay the card off monthly, Does this help me by paying them off every month or not?? But just a note KEEP YOUR INFORMATION THAT IS PRIVATE, PRIVATE IN A SAFE!! THE PERSON WHO DID THIS WAS MY X PARTNER OF 17 YEARS.    

The best way to handle these types of information lines on your credit report is to dispute them but you have to remember that if that isn't done correctly, it is like kicking a hornets nest. Just calling them and saying, "hey, I dispute this." is NOT good enough, regardless of what ANYONE says. It has to be done with a certified, return receipt letter that has been properly worded to prevent the sleezy little buggers from using a loophole. You can find a lot of information out there about how to do this on sites from people like Dave Ramsey or with self help books like Weathering Debt (either one works, but I prefer Weathering Debt, it was much more concise and to the point) but whatever you do, DON'T try to wing it and don't pay someone to do something you can do yourself with ease and for free. Besides, you need to know how to stop the problem from happening again, right?
Traditional debt consolidation companies review your debts, income and credit score. If you qualify for a debt consolidation loan, they will discuss terms with you which will include the repayment period, the interest rate and the monthly payment. After you are issued a check, you will pay off all of your individual credit cards and owe one monthly payment to the credit consolidation company. One of the downsides of working with a traditional debt consolidator is that your credit card accounts are open and available for use. You may be tempted to continue using your cards and could wind up doubling your debt. Consider the following tips if you decide to work with a traditional debt consolidation company and take out a brand new loan:

Would you like to learn more about the best way to consolidate debt? Then look no further than American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC). We are a non-profit credit counseling agency with more than 22 years of experience. We have helped thousands of clients become free of their financial burdens by consolidating debts. Our outstanding commitment to customer service shows with our A+ rating and accreditation through the Better Business Bureau.


Note that drastically reducing your credit score could impact your career, especially if you maintain a security clearance. Bad credit is the leading cause of loss of security clearance. A low credit score can also impact employability in the financial services sector. If you want to maintain a good credit score, debt settlement may not be the best way to consolidate debt.
Additionally, the security deposit you used to obtain the card is used if you were to default on your payment. However, this is not the case if the balance in which you have defaulted happens to be higher than the security deposit amount. Using the security deposit means that even if you default, the card will be paid because it is secured by your funds and you will not have the account end up in collections due to nonpayment.

With poor credit, you may not be able to get approved for new credit products like credit cards. Although you may still be able to take out an auto loan or a mortgage, you’ll pay a much higher interest rate because of your low credit score. Compared to a borrower with good credit, someone with poor credit can pay $50,000 more in interest on a mortgage. Over an entire lifetime, you could end up paying over $200,000 more in unnecessary interest just because of bad credit.
×