Unsurprisingly, consumers across the southern United States are far more likely to have subprime credit scores than consumers across the north. Minnesota had the fewest subprime consumers. In December 2016, just 21.9% of residents fell below an Equifax Risk Score of 660. Mississippi had the worst subprime rate in the nation: 48.3% of Mississippi residents had credit scores below 660 in December 2016.35
To qualify for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you must have little disposable income. A means test is applied that compares your income to the median income in your state. If your average monthly income for the six-month period leading up to your bankruptcy filing is less than the median income for the same household size in your state, you automatically qualify.
Additionally, the security deposit you used to obtain the card is used if you were to default on your payment. However, this is not the case if the balance in which you have defaulted happens to be higher than the security deposit amount. Using the security deposit means that even if you default, the card will be paid because it is secured by your funds and you will not have the account end up in collections due to nonpayment.
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If you don’t address the exact cause of your bad credit, the damage is likely to worsen the longer it goes untreated. For example, if you’ve missed a few credit-card payments, repaying at least the minimum amount needed to change your account’s status from “delinquent” to “paid” on your credit reports will prevent your score from falling further. The same is true of collections accounts, tax liens and other derogatory marks — at least to a certain extent.
Next, pay the balances due on any collection or charged-off accounts. Paying what you owe will not immediately cause a significant improvement in your credit score, but anyone considering granting you a loan or new credit will want to see that you did pay what you owed, even if it was late. Lastly, pay down balances on your open credit card accounts to between 30 and 50 percent of your credit limit. Even better, pay them off in full, and pay them in full each month thereafter. Low balances relative to your limit will add points to your score.
As newer debt weighs more heavily on your credit report than older debt, your score can drop when you make an effort to pay, whether in part or in full. While the payment will make the debt show as settled in full, it may show on your report as new debt. Regardless of how it shows on your report, ensure that the lender removes the charged-off status on your old debt and shows it as paid in full.
In some cases, it might be difficult to determine what to include as far as supporting documentation goes — that’s another way a credit repair company can help you. For example, if you’re a victim of identity theft and a fraudulent account is appearing on your credit report, it can be tough to prove it isn’t yours since you naturally don’t have any documents relating to the account.
I don’t quite understand your situation but it sounds like you owe about $10,700 in high interest credit card debt. Is that right? If you can get into a debt management plan to pay off all that debt at a lower interest rate, and the monthly payment on the DMP is affordable, I would say go for that and forget about this 22% interest loan which is very expensive.

Still, even if the math of a debt consolidation loan works out in your favor, your behavior may be the real problem. Paying off all of your credit cards and debts with a loan only shuffles the deck chairs around—you still owe money you have to pay, and if you go charging up those freshly paid-off credit cards again, those deck chairs may as well be on the Titanic.


I recently took out a debt consolidation loan to pay off my credit cards and have just the one bill – however, the loan didn’t quite cover my credit cards… I also opened two new balance transfer 0% credit cards to help cut the interest of the leftover credit card debt… I still don’t quite have enough to wipe it all into 3 bills – plus, I have a previous personal loan I have 2 more years of paying… what would be the best way to distribute these funds, and balance transfers… so that I’m cutting my interest payments, upping my cashflow so that I’m not
The Walmart® Credit Card offers a three-tiered cashback program to benefit avid Walmart shoppers. You receive 3% cash back on Walmart.com purchases (including purchases made on the Walmart app), 2% back on fuel purchases made at Walmart or Murphy USA (excluding Murphy Express) gas stations and 1% at Walmart & anywhere your card is accepted. Your cash back will be issued monthly as a statement credit for all earnings during that period. Note: This card can only be used at Walmart Stores, Walmart Supercenters, Neighborhood Markets, Walmart.com, Walmart and Murphy USA Gas Stations and Sam’s Clubs.

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If you use your credit card at an ATM, it will be treated as a cash advance. Most credit cards charge an upfront cash advance fee, which is typically about 5%. There is usually a much higher “cash advance” interest rate, which is typically above 20%. And there is no grace period, so interest starts to accrue right away. A cash advance is expensive, so beware.
Did you just get a tax refund, a bonus, a raise or an inheritance? Instead of spreading it out and making small extra payments to all of your debts, opt for the snowball method. Consider paying as much as you can towards the debt with the lowest balance so you can reduce or eliminate it entirely (while keeping the account open). This reduces your credit utilization dramatically and can increase your credit score just as dramatically and quickly. Reducing your credit utilization from 50% of your credit limit down to 30% of your credit limit can result in a 50-point score lift, according to the VantageScore report.
You need to work to get credit card utilization down below 30% (below 10% would be even better). But high utilization alone should not have brought your score down quite so low. Here’s how to get your free credit score along with a personalized plan for improving it. Because the scores come from information in your credit reports, you should also check those for errors and dispute any information that is inaccurate. Here’s how to get your free annual credit reports.
Your loan balances also affect your credit score in a similar way. The credit score calculation compares your loan current loan balance to the original loan amount. The closer your loan balances are to the original amount you borrowed, the more it hurts your credit score. Focus first on paying down credit card balances because they have more impact on your credit score.
With Chase Slate® you can save with a 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and a balance transfer fee that’s Intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. After that: Either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater.  There’s also a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months. After the intro periods end, a 16.74% - 25.49% Variable APR applies. This card also has a $0 annual fee. Plus, you can see monthly updates to your FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.

What is it? Balance transfers are when you transfer debt from a current credit card to a new card, ideally one with a 0% intro APR period. The intro period is for a set amount of time that can range from 6-21 months. Many cards offer 0% intro APR balance transfer offers in order to convince credit card users to give them their business. It’s a win-win situation for the lender and the borrower.

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Satisfying such obligations won’t remove the records from your credit reports, however. They’ll stay there for seven to 10 years, no matter what. But their status will change to show that you no longer owe money. What’s more, the newest credit scores – including VantageScore 3.0, VantageScore 4.0 and FICO Score 9 – stop considering collections accounts once they’ve been paid.
Trying to get a little bit of business advice, hope someone can help. We are struggling to make it through our slow months right now. We have about $100,000 in business debt currently active and all in good standing, we have never made a late payment. But we are getting buried with making sure we are paying all of these bills on time while still being able to order products to keep the business fully functional. We are scared we are heading towards bankruptcy or even closure. Would a debt consolidation company be able to help us? Or does it seem we are too far gone? I guess I was hoping with a debt consolidation company we could lower our monthly burden, stretching out our payment to 48-60 months.

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