I have approximate $15,000 in high interest credit card debt and just spinning my wheels making minimum monthly payments. My credit is borderline fair/good. Would credit counseling help me pay this off quicker?? I just recently leased a brand new car for 3 years and when the time comes to trade it in or finance it and keep it I want my credit to be okay to do so. What do you recommend for me??
I had a $10,000 surgery when my medical insurance lapsed. I had to fill out a form with the hospital that stated I could not afford to pay it and they forgave it/never went on my credit. If you make under a certain income, the hospital should help you get those off, call the hospital and ask. It may be too late since it’s in collections already, if that’s the case, don’t pay it because it won’t change the negative impact since it’s already in collections. Wait for it to fall off.
Once you resolve issues on your credit report, it’s time to implement a strategy to start improving your credit score. The single best thing that you can do to improve your credit score is to pay current accounts on time and in full every single month. You can picture it as burying negative information under a mountain of positive credit information.

Collections – If there are collections on your credit report, check to be sure there are not multiple reports of the same unpaid bills. Collection accounts are bought and sold, so the same information could be reported by more than one agency, which would make your credit history look worse than it is. Send documentation to prove the debt is listed more than once.
You may also be able to negotiate with creditors as part of a "goodwill adjustment." They may be willing to remove late payments that they've reported to the credit bureaus, especially if you have a history of on-time payments. While you're trying to fix your credit, don't neglect your current obligations. Whatever you do, be sure to pay all your bills on time so you don't accrue any more negative items on your report.

The Discover it® Student Cash Back is our top pick for a student card since it has a wide range of benefits. There is a cashback program where you can earn 5% cash back at different places each quarter like gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon.com or wholesale clubs up to the quarterly maximum each time you activate, plus 1% unlimited cash back automatically on all other purchases. Plus, new cardmembers can benefit from Discover automatically matching all the cash back you earn at the end of your first year. Another unique perk is the good Grades Reward: Receive a $20 statement credit each school year that your GPA is 3.0 or higher, for up to five consecutive years.


Harzog was a successful freelance journalist for over 20 years, writing for major national magazines and custom publications. She became so entrenched in the credit industry, that in 2008, she was approached by CardRatings.com to be a credit card spokesperson for their site. In 2010, Harzog then went on to become the credit card expert for Credit.com.
You’re entitled to a free credit report if a company takes “adverse action” against you, like denying your application for credit, insurance, or employment. You have to ask for your report within 60 days of receiving notice of the action. The notice includes the name, address, and phone number of the consumer reporting company. You’re also entitled to one free report a year if you’re unemployed and plan to look for a job within 60 days; if you’re on welfare; or if your report is inaccurate because of fraud, including identity theft.
Thank you for this. I have been building my credit back after Economy struggles and long term illness.  Today, I'm in a better position physically and materially. Most of my credit issues are resolved. However, I'm curious as to your next step once you resolved the medical bill situation.  Did you pay the creditor and subsequently write a letter to the credit bureaus? I have a $284 medical bill I can't recall not paying, but I would like to resolve the matter this year. 
If you are a careful money manager who fell into debt because of unusual circumstances (medical or veterinary  bill, loss of employment or some other emergency) and NOT because you spent more on your credit cards than you could afford to pay off each month, then leave the accounts open. Doing so will help your credit score, because the amount of revolving debt you have is a significant factor in your credit score. Just be sure to put the cards away. Don’t use them while you pay down your debt consolidation loan.
A debt consolidation loan streamlines existing debts into one new loan. Most unsecured consumer debt can be consolidated, including credit cards, medical bills, utility bills, payday loans, student loans, taxes and bills sent to a collection agency. Having one monthly payment instead of several can make it easier to get your finances in order and could allow you to save money on interest fees. When shopping around, it’s essential to find a loan with a lower interest rate and better terms than the original debts.

The payment amount and duration are not based on what it would take to pay off the full amount of the debt, but are instead based on calculations determined by the income of the filer, their discretionary income, their assets and their debt. Instead of forcing the debtor to tackle the full amount of their current debt at its current interest rates, Chapter 13 gives a debtor the opportunity to pay off a percentage of the debt based on what they can afford to pay over a three- to five-year period.
If you are juggling multiple credit card bills, you may benefit from the convenience of having one consolidated monthly payment. Consider all of the bills that the modern household pays (mortgage/rent, utilities, cell phone, cable, internet, etc.).  Adding 5-10 monthly credit card bills can overwhelm your bill-pay. Multiple payments are due every week. Going on vacation or having a hectic few days can result in several late payments and hundreds of dollars in fees.
The third factor that is utilized to calculate credit score is your history of credit. This category is catered towards how long each line of credit has been opened. For example, how long have your credit cards been active? How long go did you open a car loan? The longer a loan or credit line has been active, the better your history of credit will be. Now, this category is relatively easy to control. All you need to do is keep quality active lines of credit open. In other articles on our website, we discuss what could happen if you decide to close a matured credit line.

Credit card companies make balance transfer offers because they want to steal business from their competitors. So, it makes sense that the banks will not let you transfer balances between two credit cards offered by the same bank. If you have an airline credit card or a store credit card, just make sure you know which bank issues the card before you apply for a balance transfer.
A major driver of increased scores is the decreased proportion of consumers with collection items on their credit report. A credit item that falls into collections will stay on a person’s credit report for seven years. People caught in the latter end of the real estate foreclosure crisis of 2006-2011 may still have a collections item on their report today.

Take out a secured credit card from a credit union. With Most banks you will need 300-500 to start. After you receive your card charge $15-$20 at the most. When you get the bill in, pay it by or before the due. DO NOT PAY LATE!! Do this a few times and your credit should jump about 20-30 points. When your credit goes up to where you want, you can take out the money from your secure credit card. DO NOT CANCEL YOUR ACCOUNT OR YOU WILL LOSE YOUR CREDIT. (SHRED THE CARD INSTEAD) Hope this helps. God Bless 
While multiple hard inquiries can increase score drops, particularly for those who are new to credit, credit-scoring agencies recognize the importance of rate shopping. As a result, multiple inquiries for student loans that occur with a 14- to 45-day window (depending on the type of credit score) only count as a single inquiry when your score is being calculated.

Don’t try to transfer debt between two cards of the same bank. It won’t work. Balance transfer deals are meant to ‘steal’ your balance from a competing bank, not lower your rate from the same bank. So if you have a Chase Freedom® with a high rate, don’t apply for another Chase card like a Chase Slate® and expect you can transfer the balance. Apply for one from another bank.
When you find yourself with damaged credit, it’s important to catch your breath and begin laying the foundation for a brighter financial future. Testing your financial literacy and educating yourself are part of that. But the centerpiece of this effort should be your emergency fund. With money saved for a rainy day, you’ll be far less likely to miss payments and damage your credit if met by hefty emergency expenses.

This tip is a valuable financial lesson that many people can implement, and it can completely transform their financial situation. Typically, people tend to wait until the last minute to pay their bills, which results in late payments, late fees, and extended loans. The goal with this is to develop the habit of scheduling your payments to be automatic. IF you have already missed a payment in the past, this tip is even more important for you. By scheduling your payments automatically, you are making the dedication that the money will be in the account by the time the bill needs to come out. This, at the same time, if properly managed, can help direct your entire attention on paying your bills on time, rather than purchasing something out of instant gratification. Also, by showing lenders that you have set up automatic payments, it shows a level of dedication towards fast credit repair.
Applying for and opening up a new credit card increases your overall credit limit compared to the amount you have used. This, too, can result in a nice credit score bump the following month, but only works if you have good credit. One drawback: You may initially receive a 10 to 25-point new credit score ding which will readjust after a few months of responsible credit behavior.

Taking out a loan should be a relatively seamless process. There are a lot of lenders to choose from, so conducting research to see which financial institutions provide the best — and worst — user experience can save you a lot of headaches. Browse each bank’s website to review customer service contact options, read reviews and search social media to see what people are saying about your top choices.
This tip is a valuable financial lesson that many people can implement, and it can completely transform their financial situation. Typically, people tend to wait until the last minute to pay their bills, which results in late payments, late fees, and extended loans. The goal with this is to develop the habit of scheduling your payments to be automatic. IF you have already missed a payment in the past, this tip is even more important for you. By scheduling your payments automatically, you are making the dedication that the money will be in the account by the time the bill needs to come out. This, at the same time, if properly managed, can help direct your entire attention on paying your bills on time, rather than purchasing something out of instant gratification. Also, by showing lenders that you have set up automatic payments, it shows a level of dedication towards fast credit repair.
If you use the second method — and this if the first time you rehabilitated the student loan — the default associated with the loan will also be removed from your credit reports. Although the late payments associated with the loan will remain for up to seven years from the date of your first late payment, having the default removed could help your score.
There’s a way to boost your credit score that doesn’t involve paying down debt or any of the other more traditional score boosting tactics. Since credit scores are determined, in part, on the difference between your credit limit and the amount of credit you use, ask for a higher credit limit. Your chances of increasing it are likely better than you think. Of those who apply for a higher credit limit, 8 out of 10 are approved, according to a recent Bankrate Money Pulse Survey. While it helps to be over 30, odds are good for all adults. To avoid having your credit diminished by asking for a higher limit, ask for the highest credit line increase that won't trigger what's called a hard inquiry. (See also: Credit Score: Hard vs. Soft Inquiry.)

According to VantageScore report on how credit behaviors affect your credit score, those with a low credit score may see a credit score bump of 5 to 10 points every month you use responsible credit behavior such as making on-time payments. And, you may see larger jumps of 35 to 50 points or even more if your score was low because of high credit utilization and you make a large lump sum payment to one of your cards and keep the balance low.
Hybrid loan option: CommonBond offers a unique “Hybrid” rate option in which rates are fixed for five years and then become variable for five years. This option can be a good choice for borrowers who intend to make extra payments and plan on paying off their student loans within the first five years. If you can a better interest rate on the Hybrid loan than the Fixed-rate option, you may end up paying less over the life of the loan.
* Our low monthly retainer of $29 per month is charged in accordance with all applicable laws for all services performed in the preceding month. Upon retaining our services there is an industry low one time file intake fee of, for a VERY LIMITED TIME ONLY - $29, which covers the costs associated with providing access to setting up your files in our systems and providing access to our exclusive Client Central area containing educational material regarding your credit and credit matters.
To see any major or fast credit repair, try to balance your credit utilization. In the credit industry, there is something known as the sweet spot, which we covered above. The goal with this tip is to get your credit utilization into this category, or 25%-45%. So, we highly suggest creating a game plan by setting aside all your debt and categorizing in terms of priorities. Ask yourself the following questions:
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Most credit counselors offer services through local offices, online, or on the phone. If possible, find an organization that offers in-person counseling. Many universities, military bases, credit unions, housing authorities, and branches of the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service operate nonprofit credit counseling programs. Your financial institution, local consumer protection agency, and friends and family also may be good sources of information and referrals.
Public Records – Negative information from public records can include bankruptcies, civil judgments or foreclosures. Bankruptcies can be on the report for seven to 10 years, but all other public records must be removed after seven years. If the public record on your report is older than is allowed, dispute the information with the credit bureau and send documentation to prove that the debt is too old and should no longer be on the report.
It doesn’t cost anything to dispute mistakes or outdated items on your credit report. Both the credit reporting company and the information provider (the person, company, or organization that provides information about you to a credit reporting company) are responsible for correcting inaccurate or incomplete information in your report. To take advantage of all your rights, contact both the credit reporting company and the information provider.
So when I came across Brandon's system my credit was in SUCH bad shape. I knew that I didn't want to pay a credit repair company but I also was more then a little intimidated to try to take it on myself. When I stumbled on Brandon's video I felt excitement but also that caution of this feels "too good" to be true. I thought to myself you are either going to pay credit repair agencies hundred of dollars or spend a fraction of the price to test this system, so I bought the program. The videos were very simple to follow and easy to understand and I'm excited to say that after sending my first round of letters my credit score went up 88 points!!! Honestly I didn't know truly how significant that was until I talked to one of my friends who had been working with a credit repair agency for months and had only seen a 50 point jump in his credit score o_o I'm excited to send round 2 of the letters and get my credit score up even higher! BIG THANK YOU TO BRANDON!
The best way to consolidate debt is to consolidate in a way that avoids taking on additional debt. If you're facing a rising mound of unsecured debt, the best strategy is to consolidate it through a credit counseling agency. When you use this method to consolidate bills, you're not borrowing more money. Instead, your unsecured debt payments are consolidated into one monthly payment to the agency, which in turn pays your creditors each month. Your credit counselor works with your creditors to try to reduce your interest rates and eliminate extra fees, like late charges or over-limit charges.
While your credit score may suffer if you’re falling behind on monthly payments before you get your debt management plan set up, starting your plan should provide some relief. Your credit score should increase as you begin making regular monthly payments and your debt balances drop. Experian does note that you may see some negative side effects when accounts are closed, usually due to changes with your credit utilization rate or credit mix.
Credit repair is critical to saving money on insurance, loans, and credit cards, but that's not the only reason to repair your credit. A better credit score opens up new employment opportunities, even promotions and raises with your current employer. If you dream of starting your own business or just want the security of knowing you can borrow money when you want to, you should repair your credit sooner rather than later.
Obviously, the higher the utilization percentage, the worse you look. Experts have long said that using 30% of your available credit is a good way to keep your credit score high. More recently, that recommendation has been reduced to 20%. In the $5,000 limit MasterCard example above, 30% utilization would represent a $1,500 balance. Boosting your credit limit from $5,000 to $10,000 would allow for a $3,000 balance and still maintain 30% utilization. (This, of course, is just an example. It’s not likely you would get a 100% increase in your credit line. But any amount will help increase the spread and lower the utilization ratio).
If your wallet is stuffed with multiple credit cards staying on top of your accounts is probably a hassle you could do without. Keeping track of balances and due dates takes some elbow grease, and then there's the not-fun monthly ritual of figuring out how much you can afford to pay on each card. The good news is that if you are currently juggling a few cards with balances, you may be able to streamline your credit by consolidating your credit cards.
Of the major credit repair organizations, only Lexington Law has received an A rating from the Better Business Bureau. The Credit People and CreditRepair.com received high ratings from their consumers online, but are not rated by the Better Business Bureau. These companies don’t do anything you can’t do yourself, but they may be worth your money if you’ve got a lot of negative information to remove.
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