Getting a bump in credit limit on one of your existing cards has a similar effect as getting a new credit card on your credit utilization but is even quicker and easier. Another plus: While you may not get as much of a credit limit increase as with a new card, your credit score will also not suffer the new credit card ding and will benefit from the age of the existing account.
When the bureaus and data furnishers receive the dispute and supporting information, they will then work with the credit repair company to determine if the item should be removed from your credit report. The major law dictating your rights when it comes to credit reporting is the Fair Credit Reporting Act, but it isn’t the only law on your side when it comes to credit repair.
One of the quick credit repair tactics to consider first is seeing if you can increase the credit limits on your current accounts. And this is just a matter of reaching out to your credit card companies and requesting a credit limit increase. According to FICO, 30% of your credit score is tied to the amount owed on your credit accounts. A primary way they evaluate this is something called your credit utilization ratio. The ratio is simply a matter of how much you owe vs your credit limits.
Cons: Some cards charge a balance transfer fee, such as 3 percent or $5, on the amounts you transfer. Also, the combined transferred amounts and fees usually cannot be higher than your credit limit, which might not accommodate all your debts. Some lenders also don’t allow you to use a balance transfer to pay off credit cards or loans from the same lender.

How to use it effectively: The money you withdraw from your 401(k) loan should go directly to paying off your credit card debt. After your debts are paid off, payments most likely will be taken from your paychecks until your loan is repaid. If not, continue to make regular, on-time payments. While you’re repaying your loan remember to keep your job — don’t quit and avoid any actions that may lead to your dismissal so you aren’t subject to penalties.
Beyond that is creditor information, which makes up most of your reports. This includes different accounts you have (loans, credit cards, etc.), their status (open/closed, in collections), balances, credit limits and payment details. This may also include dates of missed payments or late payments, or when the accounts were sent to collections. From these details, your credit scores will be formed.
Another avenue to pursue to improve your credit score as quickly as possible is to negotiate with your creditor and credit bureaus to see if they are will to make adjustments. This can be especially effective if you have established a current strong payment record. In that case, a creditor can often be persuaded to remove previously reported late payments as a “goodwill” gesture based on your current payment history, and to encourage you to maintain the course.
Thank you. I thought my scores were better than they are and I contacted a mortgage lender who said my scores were much lower than I thought. He said to pay off all negative open accounts. Most are medical bills. He also said that even with a car loan and a secured card and Fingerhut it is not enough trade lines. He suggested I open another secured card. Use one for gas and the other for fun/groceries. He said charge no more than 30% on each only if there is the money present to pay it off when I get home that day. If so, pay all but $5 immediately. He said that plus the debt should help within a few months to raise my score in addition to keeping the existing items current. My husband has a tax lien so I promptly made arrangements for that and have applied for and was approved for a second secured card as well. I just have to wait until payday to fund it and then will work to pay off these debts and build my score. Hoping for some big results in six months.
Once you’ve filled out the form and requested reports from all three bureaus, you’ll fill out some security questions and be directed into your report, one agency at a time. If the security questions trip you up, the website will lock you out of your report, but it will offer a phone number that you can call to get your credit report via mail. If you get locked out, request the report via mail.
For secured debts, the value of the underlying collateral must be paid to those lenders, which can also increase your overall debt burden under the plan. And because the debts take several years to be discharged, the debtor is expected to maintain payments during that time. If they cannot, then they may find their filing dismissed and collections and foreclosure procedures restarting.
During the briefing, filers will learn alternative options for resolving their debt that can help them avoid filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The counseling ranges in price, with online classes offered by some providers for $14.95 per household and one-on-one phone sessions for $50 per person. Lastly, some providers charge an extra fee for the completion certificate sent to the bankruptcy court.
A secured credit card, in particular, is the ideal tool for rebuilding credit. They offer nearly guaranteed approval because you’ll need to place a security deposit that will double as your spending limit. Secured cards are also far less expensive than unsecured credit cards for people with bad credit. And you can’t tell them apart from unsecured cards on a credit report.

Reliant Credit Repair got my scores up 63 points in 60 days. they got this Wells Fargo account in the amount of $11,000 removed from my report, although it wasnt mine, I am so thankful they got it off!!! I now have Discover left on there, that is also not mine, but needs to be removed. Its a little over $4,000 but they got it remoevd form transunion so far. My Transunion score is now 723 and my other two are in thr high 600's so im almost there.


Over one-third of your score depends on whether you pay your creditors on time. So, make sure you pay all your bills by their due dates, keep receipts, canceled checks or reference numbers to prove you did so. While utility and phone bills aren't normally figured into your credit score, they may appear on a credit report when they're delinquent, especially if the provider has sent your account to a collection agency and forwarded that information to the bureaus.

Public Records – Negative information from public records can include bankruptcies, civil judgments or foreclosures. Bankruptcies can be on the report for seven to 10 years, but all other public records must be removed after seven years. If the public record on your report is older than is allowed, dispute the information with the credit bureau and send documentation to prove that the debt is too old and should no longer be on the report.

To have a good credit score, you need to have positive information reported into your credit report on a monthly basis. The easiest way to do that is with a credit card. Just try to keep your utilization low (although there is no magic number, VantageScore released data showing that people with excellent credit scores tend to have utilization below 10%). And make sure you pay your statement balance in full and on time every month. If you repeat this, over time your score will improve.

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We agree that it is very important for individuals to be knowledgeable of their credit standing. When you have a credit-monitoring tool like freecreditscore.com on your side, you get e-mail alerts whenever there’s a change in your credit score–and you can also see your credit score whenever you want. With the free credit report from the government, you only see your report once a year. If you monitor your credit score regularly, it’s easier to catch inaccuracies before it’s too late.
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