Many companies offer very good deals in the first year to win new customers. These are often called “switching incentives.” For example, your mobile phone company could offer 50% off its normal rate for the first 12 months. Or your cable company could offer a big discount on the first year if you buy the bundle package. Credit card companies are no different. These companies want your debt, and are willing to give you a big discount in the first year to get you to transfer.
The intro offers, coupled with the rewards program make The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express the frontrunner among balance transfer cards, outpacing competitors. This card presents cardholders with the unique opportunity to transfer a balance and make a large purchase during the intro period, all while earning rewards on new purchases. To qualify for this card, you need Excellent/Good credit.

•    I then added her to 3 of my credit cards as an authorized user. I choose the oldest with high credit limits.(I did not give her the cards to use-only added her as an authorized user for my own protection) BEFORE being added as an authorized user be SURE you know the credit history and habits of the owner of the account. If there is a late payment on their account this will be reflected on YOUR credit history!
Excuse me angry person commenting below my comment, I dont feel the need to prove to anyone that my review is genuine, the results im recieving are enough for me however, This is a platform for consumers like myself to share our experiences with other people ACTUALLY looking for credit repair. It honestly seems very odd to me that you targeted all Reliant Credit Repair Reviews and not the Clean Slate ones that seem to have quite a bit of likes and posts. Are you implying that their reviews are fake as well? look i think i speak for everyone on when I say if we want to leave a review about our experience we have the freedom to do so on this platform and if you dont like it please take your negativity elsewhere. Thank you. Ill be posting my review on Google and Yelp with photos for those who want to see my progress -Mr. Masha

You can start to resolve identity theft issues by visiting www.identitytheft.gov to report identity theft and get a recovery plan. This is an excellent, free website created by the Federal Trade Commission. In addition to reporting identity theft, you will receive a free action plan, and you’ll gain free access to people who can guide you through the identity resolution process.

Before we jump into specifically learn how to repair credit fast, the last area that we would like to discuss is the importance of your credit report for fast credit repair. As you will learn in the following section, your credit report plays a major role in your credit score. The stronger your credit report is, the higher your credit score will be. In many cases, people notice fast credit repair simply by taking the time to learn about their credit report and fixing any mistakes that they may find. With that being said, we would like to say that, the first step of fast credit repair always begins with your credit report. Reason being, given the way the credit system works today, many lenders are beginning to look deeper into one’s credit report, deeming it more valuable than 3 simple numbers. Consider this, your credit report includes some of the most pertinent information regarding your financial history, including:
The credit union is probably taking all your debt into consideration, not just the mortgage. And with a personal loan, new mortgage, credit cards, car loan and student loan, it sounds like you have quite a few bills you’re handling. It’s understandable you want to get your interest rates down, though, and it’s good you’re trying to be proactive about the process. Just because one lender turned you down doesn’t mean they all will. But you do want to be careful about applying for loans with multiple lenders as the inquiries can impact your scores. You might want to try one of the other options mentioned in the article before you give up. If you get turned down by multiple lenders, though, then you may want to at least talk with a credit counselor to see if they have suggestions.
The Island Approach also gives you a built-in warning system for overspending. If you ever see finance charges on an account earmarked for everyday expenses, you’ll know you’re overspending. Separating everyday expenses from a balance that you’re carrying from month to month will help you save on finance charges, too. Interest charges are based on an account’s average daily balance, after all.
The Target REDcard™ Credit Card offers great perks that are sure to please frequent Target shoppers. You receive 5% off every eligible transaction made at Target and Target.com. The discount automatically comes off your purchase — no redemption needed. Other benefits include free shipping on most items, early access to sales and exclusive extras like special items, offers, and 10% off coupon as a gift on your REDcard anniversary each year.* Recently, cardholders received early access to Black Friday deals. Reminder: This card can only be used at Target and on Target.com.
Several years have passed since technology started to fly by at what seemed like the speed of light and the demand for products and services began to change and adapt to meet the latest consumer pace. Services that previously took weeks were forced to move into days, soon followed by the same day and ultimately “within hours” or even “instant.”  Fast became the motto from the drive-thru windows for food, banking and almost anything and everything and “do it yourself” and “easy assembly in minutes” began to thrive.
Conduct some research on attorneys ahead of time. Read reviews online and consider meeting with more than one attorney in your area. Your bankruptcy attorney will help put together the forms required to file Chapter 13. This includes a bankruptcy petition, debt and income schedules, and a Chapter 13 repayment plan you have worked on with your attorney to create.
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Not only does a Chapter 13 filing require a long-term commitment and an understanding of the impact on your credit, but it also carries an expense, as the filer must pay the court, the trustee and their attorney. Before you consider attempting a Chapter 13 without an attorney, note that the U.S. Bankruptcy Court instruction packet states that it is “… extremely difficult to succeed in a Chapter 11, 12 or 13 case without an attorney.”

If following the steps above seems daunting, some organizations specialize in paid credit repair services. Most of the services require a monthly subscription fee between $60-$100 per month, and most reviews report that the negative items are completely removed within 3-5 months. Despite the high cost, legitimate companies provide a valuable service if you’ve been the victim of identity theft and you want someone else to do the work for you.
Despite anyone's diligence in managing their money wisely, sometimes financial hardships happen because of a job loss, medical condition, divorce, or other life events. If you have problems making ends meet, contact your creditors or a legitimate non-profit agency that specializes in credit counseling services for assistance. Do this as soon as possible to see how consolidated debt can help relieve the burden of financial stresses. The longer you wait, the more challenges you'll encounter. Consolidating debt is often your best alternative in these situations, and a counselor can help you with the process.
Each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — is required to provide you with a free copy of your credit report once every 12 months, if you ask for it. To order, visit annualcreditreport.com, or call 1-877-322-8228. You may order reports from each of the three credit reporting companies at the same time, or you can stagger your requests throughout the year.
I've racked up a good bit of credit card debt, and while I'm slowly paying it down, it's a pain wrangling multiple bills with different interest rates. My credit union is offering debt consolidation loans with a lower rate than any of my cards—should I take that, use it to pay off all of my cards, and only have one, low-interest bill to pay every month?

Assuming you are consistently paying on time (the No. 1 thing you can do to help your credit), take a look at your debt-to-available credit ratio. You want to get that to under 30% (under 10% is even better). Your credit mix is also a factor. If you have the income to make more than minimum payments, though, that is the best way to make an impact. You can read more here:


Now, let’s take this a step further; one of the biggest misconception of this industry is that one’s credit score and credit report are the same thing.  The truth is, both concepts are gravely different. A credit report is a mere profile of your entire credit history – including all your positive and negative moments. This report is held and created by the three credit agencies, or bureau: Equifax, Experian, and Call Credit.  It’s here that lenders can discover if you’ve missed a payment, how many loans you have taken out, and even how reliable you are. On the other hand, a credit score is a number that derives on five different factors from your credit report, which leads us to our next significant section.
The last major factor is your history of applying for credit. This accounts for 10% of most credit scores and may be holding you back if you applied for several credit accounts recently. This factor also takes time to correct, but any hard inquiries into your credit will only ding your scores slightly, and as they get older, they will have less of an impact. A year is generally when they begin to stop hurting your credit scores.
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