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The best way to consolidate debt varies by individual, depending on your financial circumstances and preferences. For some, the best way to consolidate debt may be paying off smaller balances first and then adding those payments to the bigger bills until those are paid off. Others might consider transferring balances to one credit card or getting a consolidation loan. However, consolidating balances to one credit card or using a loan can be risky because, if you need to borrow additional money, it may be tempting to use one of the accounts with a zero balance. Then the debt grows, and you can find yourself in financial trouble quickly.


Yes it does! I tried this about 20 yrs. ago! I consolidated my debts into one amount! I also had my interest rates reduced by the loan company. I discovered that any money that was shaved off my debt in any way whether by lower interest rates or by taking settlements were considered charge-offs and demolished your credit rating. It took me over 30 yrs. to regain any credit worthiness at all!
Most people don’t realize that it’s not mandatory for creditors to submit information to the credit reporting agencies. Of course, credit cards, mortgage lenders, etc. always will, but some smaller accounts don’t bother because there’s really no upside for them. But that also presents an opportunity for the average consumer that needs a quick credit score increase, as you can ask a variety of creditors or lenders if they will start reporting. For instance, cell phone companies, utility providers, and even landlords can report your history of on-time and in-full payments to the credit bureaus. Once that positive track record hits your credit, your score will go up proportionally!
I don’t quite understand your situation but it sounds like you owe about $10,700 in high interest credit card debt. Is that right? If you can get into a debt management plan to pay off all that debt at a lower interest rate, and the monthly payment on the DMP is affordable, I would say go for that and forget about this 22% interest loan which is very expensive.
Next, estimate your monthly spending habits for other expenses such as gas, groceries and entertainment. Create a limit, based on your income, of what you can spend in each of the different categories of expenses. For example, if you tend to spend $400 a month on groceries, try to stick to $300 a month on groceries by making changes like buying generic brands, using coupons, and resisting impulse purchases.
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