I have about $10-11,000 in credit card debt. I am thinking about consolidating, however, after doing some research I’m not sure I want to go that route. I have a good creadit score and I do not want to hurt my credit score by having to close accounts, etc. However, I feel like I can’t make any progress with my credit cards due to interest, and I’m trying to avoid opening anymore credit cards that would have low or no interest. I’ve thought about taking out a bank loan to pay my credit cards off. Does this seem like it would be the best option for me? Do you suggest any other options?
The cause of your debt may be due to overspending, and that’s where creating a budget can help. You can view a snapshot of your expenses and see where you’re able to cut costs and hopefully save money to pay off debts you may have. There are plenty of budgeting apps that are free and allow you to link various accounts to get a holistic view of your finances.
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A higher credit score: If you have maxed out your credit cards, your utilization ratio will be very high. That ratio can have a big, negative impact on your credit score. By paying off credit cards with a loan, you will be reducing the utilization on your cards. According to a study by Lending Club , people who used a loan to pay off credit cards saw an average score increase of 21 points within three months of the loan. The best way to improve your credit score is to eliminate your credit card debt burden completely.
Personal Loans: With the rise of marketplace lenders, obtaining a personal loan with a low interest rate has become increasingly easy. Most lenders will allow you to shop for an interest rate without hurting your credit score. You should shop around for the best rate online at websites like MagnifyMoney or NerdWallet, where you can find variable interest rates as low as 4.74%.

One of the biggest mistakes that any borrower can ever make is trying to dispute their entire credit report. Typically, traditional credit repair companies will utilize this tactic; however, it has been proven very risky and potentially debilitating to the overall purpose. By disputing your entire report, you may remove some of positive aspects that are boosting your score.

The third factor that is utilized to calculate credit score is your history of credit. This category is catered towards how long each line of credit has been opened. For example, how long have your credit cards been active? How long go did you open a car loan? The longer a loan or credit line has been active, the better your history of credit will be. Now, this category is relatively easy to control. All you need to do is keep quality active lines of credit open. In other articles on our website, we discuss what could happen if you decide to close a matured credit line.
Kevin Han, a Minneapolis-based attorney who runs FinancialPanther.com, a blog focused on side hustles and reducing debt, says that after law school, he got in the habit of calculating the cost of his debt. His suggestion: "Figure out how much your debt costs in interest per year, then divide that by 365. When I did this, I found out my debt after I graduated law school cost me $17 per day. When I realized this, it got me super pumped to pay off my debt as fast as possible. Each time I paid off more of my debt, my daily interest that I was paying dropped," he says. Thanks to that strategy, along with smart budgeting, Han ended up paying off $87,000 in student loans in two and a half years.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy requires a $235 case filing fee and a $75 miscellaneous administrative fee, plus attorney costs. Chapter 7 bankruptcy comes with a $245 case filing fee, a $75 miscellaneous administrative fee and a $15 trustee charge, as well as attorney charges. With both types of bankruptcy, you are also required to pay for two credit counseling sessions that cost $50 to $100 each.


Sometimes in life, you can take your sweet time, like when you’re taking a Sunday drive, getting to know someone before getting married, or putting together Ikea furniture. However, there are plenty of other instances where time is of the essence. Shopping at the mall on Christmas Eve? You’ll probably want to get in and get out. Have a big project at work and the boss is flying in tomorrow? It behooves you to have it done if you want that raise.
In 2008, American households carried $280 billion in debt. While debt dwindled in the following years, in 2017 the country hit another record – $13 trillion in household debt, including mortgages, car loans, credit card debt and student loans, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. If you, too, are struggling with debt and you're looking for some strategies to reduce what you owe, try implementing these smart money-management habits.
A personal loan is for a set period of time; three to five years is common. It's important to understand that your monthly payments will be a fixed amount. That's a bit different than a credit card balance, where you can vary your payments month-to-month as long as you hit the minimum amount due. And a credit card does not have a fixed payback period.
Many companies offer very good deals in the first year to win new customers. These are often called “switching incentives.” For example, your mobile phone company could offer 50% off its normal rate for the first 12 months. Or your cable company could offer a big discount on the first year if you buy the bundle package. Credit card companies are no different. These companies want your debt, and are willing to give you a big discount in the first year to get you to transfer.
Sometimes you fall into debt due to unexpected expenses that may arise from medical issues or other events. An emergency fund can be a great way to provide yourself with a safety net in the case of unexpected expenses that may otherwise put you in debt. It’s up to you how much you put into an emergency fund, but keep in mind it should be somewhat easily accessible so you can quickly withdraw it to pay bills before they become past due.

Unlike other types of credit, even people with deep subprime credit scores usually qualify to open a secured credit card. However, credit card use among people with poor credit scores is still near an all-time low. In the last decade, credit card use among deep subprime borrowers fell 16.7%. Today, just over 50% of deep subprime borrowers have credit card accounts.30
The right way: You should expect some fees, but avoid excessive fees when you consolidate. You don’t want to make your journey out of debt any steeper than it has to be. It’s worth noting that a debt management program has fees, but they get set by state regulation. They also get rolled into your program payments, so you don’t actually incur an extra bill.
For example, assume you have a credit card with a $1,000 limit. It’s a rewards card, so you use it for everything. In fact, every month, you hit your limit. The statement arrives, you owe $1,000, and you send in a check to pay it off. But the credit card company is likely reporting the statement balance each month. So, it looks like you have a $1,000 limit and a $1,000 balance. That’s a 100 percent credit utilization rate.
Make no mistake: if you want help with your debt, you should get it. Don't let social stigma or ego get in the way—there are plenty of ways to get on the right track that go further than blog posts and stop short of putting you back in debt to someone else. Debt repayment and credit counseling programs can negotiate lower interest rates on your behalf, or help you do it yourself. They can help you with your budget, and help you plan a route out of debt that turns your credit into a tool you control, as opposed to a monster than controls you. If you need the help, get it—and definitely do that before you take out a loan. Photo by Media Bakery13 (Shutterstock).
Unsurprisingly, consumers across the southern United States are far more likely to have subprime credit scores than consumers across the north. Minnesota had the fewest subprime consumers. In December 2016, just 21.9% of residents fell below an Equifax Risk Score of 660. Mississippi had the worst subprime rate in the nation: 48.3% of Mississippi residents had credit scores below 660 in December 2016.35
Perhaps our favorite secured card, Discover it® Secured, has numerous benefits for those looking to rebound from a bad credit score. There is a $200 minimum security deposit that will become your line of credit, which is typical of secured credit cards. Your deposit is equal to your credit line, with a maximum deposit of $2,500. Additional perks include a rewards program (very rare for secured cards) that offers 2% cash back at restaurants or gas stations on up to $1,000 in combined purchases each quarter, plus 1% cash back on all other credit card purchases.
Both Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy can allow you to keep your house if requirements are satisfied. Chapter 13 bankruptcy is especially popular with homeowners who have considerably equity since it allows them to stay in their home and continue making payments while they pay off all, or a portion of, their other debts through a repayment plan..

The most important factor when it comes to one’s credit score is their credit payment history. What this means is, are you making on-time payments, have you ever missed a payment, and are you delinquent on any payments? Putting these numbers into practice, one missed payment can impact over 35% of your entire credit score. On our website, we discuss how, in some circumstances, this can be detrimental, leading to up to 100-point credit score drops.

It’s likely that the debt collector has the incorrect amount for your debt or has tacked on high fees — Rheingold said you may owe $500, but a third-party debt collector may inflate that number to $2,500 with fees. Both of these practices are illegal. Third-party debt collectors cannot misrepresent the amount you owe or collect fees or interest above what’s stated in your original contract.
If you’re looking specifically for a nonprofit credit counseling agency to work with, explore NFCC member agencies, all of which are nonprofit. NFCC member agencies are required to meet eligibility criteria that ensure they are accredited by a third party, upfront about included fees and provide consumers with counseling and financial guidance that can help them improve their finances over time.
As part of the bankruptcy completion, there are two courses you need to take. The first is the pre-filing credit counseling and the second is the pre-discharge debtor education, which is a financial management course before you make your final bankruptcy plan payment. In taking both courses now, before you file, you can learn about a variety of options for debt consolidation and ways to rework your budget and re-prioritize your spending. It’s possible that this re-education can give you the skills and resources you need to create a personal plan for organizing and tackling your debt without filing for bankruptcy.
This story is long winded and all, but the point is, it doesn't matter how bad you have screwed up. It happens to the best of people (I'm an alright kind of guy). But the only way to fix it is to put your foot down, get dirty and fix it. It won’t always be as quick as this and will most likely take a year or more to get in a good place. Then years of maintenance. But if you need a quick hit to your score in a good way, read through your reports carefully (with a credit advisor if you need to. Many personal banks will do this with your for free if you have accounts there in good standing) If it looks like there's something off or something you can fix, call your broker, go over the report with them and STRONGLY insist on a rapid rescore. They will get all your info and see what they can do.

As part of the bankruptcy completion, there are two courses you need to take. The first is the pre-filing credit counseling and the second is the pre-discharge debtor education, which is a financial management course before you make your final bankruptcy plan payment. In taking both courses now, before you file, you can learn about a variety of options for debt consolidation and ways to rework your budget and re-prioritize your spending. It’s possible that this re-education can give you the skills and resources you need to create a personal plan for organizing and tackling your debt without filing for bankruptcy.
In more cases than not, debt consolidation loans don't make sense. They're certainly attractive: the lure of being able to pay off all of your credit cards is a strong one, especially in exchange for a single monthly payment to your bank or credit union at a lower interest rate. It's definitely a tantalizing opportunity, but it's not perfect. Remember, debt consolidation loans are financial products, which means financial institutions wouldn't offer them to you if they didn't make money from them. Here are a few tips to make sure you're not falling into a trap:
Education Loan Finance:This is a student loan refinancing option that is offered through SouthEast Bank. They have competitive rates with variable rates ranging from 2.55% – 6.01% APR and fixed rates ranging from 3.09% – 6.69% APR. Education Loan Finance also offers a “Fast Track Bonus”, so if you accept your offer within 30 days of your application date, you can earn $100 bonus cash.

Thrivent: Partnered with Thrivent Federal Credit Union, Thrivent Student Loan Resources offers variable rates starting at 4.13% APR and fixed rates starting at 3.99% APR. It is important to note that in order to qualify for refinancing through Thrivent, you must be a member of the Thrivent Federal Credit Union. If not already a member, borrowers can apply for membership during the student refinance application process.
People typically consolidate credit card debt if they have debt on high-interest credit cards and are incurring high-interest charges. By consolidating credit card debt, they can potentially save a great deal of money on interest payments and get out of debt sooner than if they left their debt on high-interest credit cards since more of their payment will go toward their principal balance.

American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC) offers consumer credit solutions ranging from debt counseling and debt consolidation relief, to pre-bankruptcy counseling and post-bankruptcy debtor education. If you are seeking debt consolidation options, ACCC offers a simple and effective consolidation program that's more prudent and beneficial than a debt settlement solution or taking out loans for debt consolidation. For personalized credit counseling advice and to learn about the best way to consolidate debt, contact an ACCC credit advisor today.
A major driver of increased scores is the decreased proportion of consumers with collection items on their credit report. A credit item that falls into collections will stay on a person’s credit report for seven years. People caught in the latter end of the real estate foreclosure crisis of 2006-2011 may still have a collections item on their report today.
You're also entitled to a free credit report if you've been turned down for credit because of something on your credit report, if you're currently receiving government assistance, if you're unemployed and planning to look for a job soon, or if you think you've been a victim of credit card fraud or identity theft. Some states even have laws that let you get an additional free credit report each year. All these free credit reports should be ordered directly through the credit bureaus.
All very good information.... but I am not sure that getting a credit offer with a pre approval doesn't recheck your credit when you actually apply. Every credit card I signed up for did a credit inquiry.... however.... I really like your advice about adding your daughter to your accounts... this doesnt put a hard inquiry on her credit report and it makes it look like the card is hers. She doesn't even have to use it but it will make her score jump. Great advice
This is incorrect.You cannot decide when to take the secured deposit back-only the credit card issuer can do this.Also, shredding a card is a bad move as creditors will lower your credit limit or even cancel your card if it is not used somewhat regularly.The end result of this will be one less line of credit and a lower credit limit (which can make it harder to keep your utilization low),thus resulting in a lower credit score.
You need to review, in detail, your credit report from all three credit reporting agencies. You can use AnnualCreditReport.com to obtain your report for free. As you review the report, keep track of any information that you believe is incorrect. Credit scores are built using data from the credit bureaus, so it is important to ensure the data at Experian, Equifax and TransUnion is accurate.
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