Balance transfer deals can be hard to come by if your credit isn’t great. But some banks are more open to it than others, and Aspire Credit Union is one of them, saying ‘fair’ or ‘good’ credit is needed for this card. Anyone can join Aspire, but if you’re looking for a longer deal you also might want to check if you’re pre-qualified for deals from other banks, without a hit to your credit score, using the list of options here.
If you have one of those letters we mentioned earlier that details your credit problems, you have some idea of what’s holding you back. Even though it may seem complex, as we mentioned, your credit score is based on five core factors: payment history, credit utilization, the age of credit accounts, mix of credit accounts and history of applying for credit. They’re not equally weighted, and this information will most likely vary between credit bureaus.
The Capital One® Secured Mastercard® is great for people who may not have the cash available for a $200 security deposit. The minimum security deposit is $49, $99 or $200, based on your creditworthiness. If you qualify for the $49 or $99 deposit, you will still receive a $200 credit limit. This is a great feature, plus you can get access to a higher credit line after making your five monthly payments on time — without needing to deposit more money. This card also comes with Platinum Mastercard benefits that include auto rental and travel accident insurance, 24-hour travel assistance services and more.
With Chase Slate® you can save with a 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and a balance transfer fee that’s Intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. After that: Either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater.  There’s also a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months. After the intro periods end, a 16.74% - 25.49% Variable APR applies. This card also has a $0 annual fee. Plus, you can see monthly updates to your FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.
With Chase Slate® you can save with a 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and a balance transfer fee that’s Intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. After that: Either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater.  There’s also a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months. After the intro periods end, a 16.74% - 25.49% Variable APR applies. This card also has a $0 annual fee. Plus, you can see monthly updates to your FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.
Before becoming a writer, she worked as a CPA for the former BellSouth Mobility. After maxing out seven credit cards and getting into credit card debt, she decided to leave her cubicle to become a financial journalist and help others avoid the mistakes she had made. Through her books and media appearances, she's become well-known in the credit industry as a consumer advocate.
To have a good credit score, you need to have positive information reported into your credit report on a monthly basis. The easiest way to do that is with a credit card. Just try to keep your utilization low (although there is no magic number, VantageScore released data showing that people with excellent credit scores tend to have utilization below 10%). And make sure you pay your statement balance in full and on time every month. If you repeat this, over time your score will improve.

* Your loan terms, including APR, may differ based on loan purpose, amount, term length, and your credit profile. Rate is quoted with AutoPay discount. AutoPay discount is only available prior to loan funding. Rates without AutoPay are 0.50% higher. If your application is approved, your credit profile will determine whether your loan will be unsecured or secured. Subject to credit approval. Conditions and limitations apply. Advertised rates and terms are subject to change without notice.
While the Savings Secured Visa Platinum Card from State Department Federal CU has a slightly higher security deposit at $250, it does have one of the lowest APRs of a secured card at 13.99% Variable. This may come in handy if you find yourself carrying a balance month to month — but we strongly encourage you to pay each bill on time and in full to avoid interest charges. This card is available to everyone regardless of residence by joining the American Consumer Council for free during the application process.
The Bank of America® Travel Rewards Credit Card for Students allows you to earn unlimited 1.5 points for every $1 you spend on all purchases everywhere, every time and no expiration on points. This is a simple flat-rate card that doesn’t require activation or paying on time to earn the full amount of points per dollar, like the other two cards mentioned above. If you plan to do a semester abroad or often travel outside the U.S., this card is a good choice since there is no foreign transaction fee. Students with a Bank of America® checking or savings account can experience the most benefits with this card since you receive a 10% customer points bonus when points are redeemed into a Bank of America® checking or savings account. And, Preferred Rewards clients can increase that bonus 25%-75%.Read our roundup of the best student credit cards.
If you are working with a credit counselor and think you’ll miss a payment, they can take proactive steps to mitigate consequences and create a plan to get you back on track. They can even negotiate to have additional late payments or late fees reduced or waived if you miss a payment. The key to making this work is being completely open and honest about your situation and speaking with your credit counselor as soon as you realize your payment will be late.
Would you like to learn more about the best way to consolidate debt? Then look no further than American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC). We are a non-profit credit counseling agency with more than 22 years of experience. We have helped thousands of clients become free of their financial burdens by consolidating debts. Our outstanding commitment to customer service shows with our A+ rating and accreditation through the Better Business Bureau.
I do not agree with the secured card info you've provided.  They are great tools when used correctly.  You can find one with no/small annual fee.  The interest rate won't come into play if you pay your balance in full each month.  Even if you don't pay in full, the interest on a very low balance is a non-factor.  Alomst any credit union will allow you to open an account with as little as $5 and secured card with $300/500.  My card is $500 and I never charge more than $150(30%).  It takes will power to not max it out.  You don;t want to fall back into old habits (if that is what got you into this situation in the first place).
People typically consolidate credit card debt if they have debt on high-interest credit cards and are incurring high-interest charges. By consolidating credit card debt, they can potentially save a great deal of money on interest payments and get out of debt sooner than if they left their debt on high-interest credit cards since more of their payment will go toward their principal balance.

If an investigation doesn’t resolve your dispute with the credit reporting company, you can ask that a statement of the dispute be included in your file and in future reports. You also can ask the credit reporting company to give your statement to anyone who got a copy of your report in the recent past. You’ll probably have to pay for this service.


If you're hopelessly drowning in debt, know that you can't negotiate any lower interest rates with your credit card companies or creditors, or if the math works out, a debt consolidation loan may be a good decision for you. Similarly, if you're in serious trouble with high interest rates, high monthly payments (that you're having trouble with already), and too many bills, a debt consolidation loan might help. Combined with a debt repayment plan or credit counseling, it can be used to pay off all of your debt at a fraction of their original cost. If it may be a good time to strike, pay it all off, and walk away debt-free. Photo by erules123.

Thank you for this. I have been building my credit back after Economy struggles and long term illness.  Today, I'm in a better position physically and materially. Most of my credit issues are resolved. However, I'm curious as to your next step once you resolved the medical bill situation.  Did you pay the creditor and subsequently write a letter to the credit bureaus? I have a $284 medical bill I can't recall not paying, but I would like to resolve the matter this year. 
The best way is to be sure you are paying all your bills on time. And, if you have credit cards, try to keep your balance to less than 30% of your credit limit (less than 10% is even better). We suggest checking your credit score monthly (you can get two scores every 30 days from Credit.com), along with personalized advice for improving your credit. Here’s how to monitor your credit score for free.
You could misuse loan funds: A home equity loan can be used for just about anything, and that may be problematic for borrowers with poor spending habits. You may, for instance, want to pay for an upcoming vacation or wedding, but that will only result in more future debt without any return on your investment. Home repairs or renovations are a better use of funds, as they can increase your property value.
Once your cards and debts are paid off, will you cancel the credit cards? Sure, you get credit cards with zero balances and no bills out of the loan, but one of the biggest problems with debt consolidation loans is that they do nothing to change the behaviors that got you into debt in the first place. Instead, they add another creditor to your pile, and fan the flames of going into debt to pay off more debt. If you even think you might be tempted to use those cards again after paying them off, or if you're using debt consolidation as an easy out or way to avoid really looking at your budget, it's not right for you. The last thing you want is to take out a loan, pay off your cards, and then charge up your cards again—now you've done nothing but dig your hole twice as deep.
Note that drastically reducing your credit score could impact your career, especially if you maintain a security clearance. Bad credit is the leading cause of loss of security clearance. A low credit score can also impact employability in the financial services sector. If you want to maintain a good credit score, debt settlement may not be the best way to consolidate debt.
You could misuse loan funds: A home equity loan can be used for just about anything, and that may be problematic for borrowers with poor spending habits. You may, for instance, want to pay for an upcoming vacation or wedding, but that will only result in more future debt without any return on your investment. Home repairs or renovations are a better use of funds, as they can increase your property value.
Chapter 13 also makes it easier to repay debt since it effectively consolidates all the listed debt into one payment that can be made to the trustee monthly. In the case of what’s called a “cramdown,” Chapter 13 may even allow a debtor to reduce the amount owed on their secured debt by reducing the balance to match the value of the underlying collateral and effectively reducing the interest.
Those with poor credit or no credit can obtain a low credit limit secured credit card (by putting up a security deposit). This is reported to the credit bureaus as a regular credit card and allows you to build a positive payment history quickly. Eventually, the credit card company (and others) will offer you a higher traditional credit limit without the security.

If you need money fast, a home equity loan might be a good option. A home equity loan can provide you with a lump sum of money in a matter of weeks; the borrowed amount can then be paid off on a monthly basis for a fixed rate. It can be especially helpful to use this type of loan to help consolidate your current debt. A home equity loan can combine debt from various lenders, such as different credit card companies, and place it into one convenient payment.
Aside from all things finances, lenders and agencies will also consider your living history. While this is not typically disclosed, it’s a facet that must be taken into consideration. Are you the type of individual who moves from location to location? Have you lived in the same home for over 10-15 years? Chances are, if you are categorized in the latter, lenders will be more interested in helping you. Keep in mind, lenders are taking a deeper looking into individual characteristics and traits. An individual that continues to move may be inconsistent or risky. If you are quick to move from location to location, are you quick to spend all the credit lent to you?
While the Savings Secured Visa Platinum Card from State Department Federal CU has a slightly higher security deposit at $250, it does have one of the lowest APRs of a secured card at 13.99% Variable. This may come in handy if you find yourself carrying a balance month to month — but we strongly encourage you to pay each bill on time and in full to avoid interest charges. This card is available to everyone regardless of residence by joining the American Consumer Council for free during the application process.

Once you complete a plan to repay your debt, you should also complete a thorough review of your credit report. Creditor should automatically inform the credit bureaus that your account is paid or current. However, mistakes and errors happen frequently, particularly following a period of financial hardship. That means it’s up to you to make sure your credit report is up to date and that old errors aren’t hanging around.

Your debt doesn’t qualify for bankruptcy. Not all types of debt qualify for bankruptcy, which is why it’s not a solution for everyone. Cole said her company receives many inquiries about student loan debt because many people don’t realize student loan debt is not dischargeable in bankruptcy. Other types of debt that do not qualify for bankruptcy include alimony, child support, most taxes and debts resulting from fraud.
The secured credit card is a way to build and establish credit to obtain higher credit scores. If you found that you cannot get approved for a traditional credit card, you’re still likely to get approved for a secured credit card because there is less risk for the lender. The card issuer will report to the credit bureaus about your ability to pay the credit card on time and how you manage and use the balance.
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