Once your cards and debts are paid off, will you cancel the credit cards? Sure, you get credit cards with zero balances and no bills out of the loan, but one of the biggest problems with debt consolidation loans is that they do nothing to change the behaviors that got you into debt in the first place. Instead, they add another creditor to your pile, and fan the flames of going into debt to pay off more debt. If you even think you might be tempted to use those cards again after paying them off, or if you're using debt consolidation as an easy out or way to avoid really looking at your budget, it's not right for you. The last thing you want is to take out a loan, pay off your cards, and then charge up your cards again—now you've done nothing but dig your hole twice as deep.
Just because you have a poor credit history doesn’t mean you can’t get credit. Creditors set their own standards, and not all look at your credit history the same way. Some may look only at recent years to evaluate you for credit, and they may give you credit if your bill-paying history has improved. It may be worthwhile to contact creditors informally to discuss their credit standards.
While this might seem like an obvious debt-repayment strategy, Cavalieri – and many personal finance experts – suggest that you set up your payments with your bank or debit card, so that anything you owe is automatically paid every month. "Automation is key. Setting up payments to go automatically will help keep things humming and ensure you do not miss any payments," Cavalieri says. That way, not only will you start filling the debt hole, you'll avoid late fees and you'll improve your credit score, which may allow you to refinance some debt for better interest rates.
Keep up the good work and employ these strategies to repair your credit as your budget and credit score permits to watch your score continue to increase. If you feel overwhelmed by your credit problems, you might consider professional credit repair help. Remember, just five or 10 points can be the difference between sub-prime and prime credit or prime credit and excellent credit and each level of credit improvement has its rewards.

Of course, those situations aren't the norm, and most of us with credit card bills looking to get rid of them aren't in that position. That's not to say there aren't situations where debt consolidation loans can offer people who really need them the breathing room to get out of debt and organize their finances. ReadyForZero has a great post on this topic, and showcases some examples of when debt consolidation can be a good choice—and even save you money on interest while getting you out of debt faster.
Millions of Americans are suffering from dinged-up credit: the lingering result of the recession, the lack (until recently) of real increase in wages, the economy's sluggish growth. But a strong credit score is the backbone of an individual's financial health, and its importance goes beyond simply getting a low interest rate on a loan. A driver's credit score, for instance, is a major factor in pricing auto insurance.
Hi , so I started out with a 421 in December 2014 , I had a foreclosure , no credit cards , horrible spending habits , collections etc. My foreclosure fell off my report and I went to 453 . I applied for a credit one unsecured card , high interest and annual fees but all I could get at the time (300 credit limit). Charged gas every month , maybe 50 and paid it right off .In March got a cl increase to 500. My credit went to a 479. Appied for a Capital one card w/ 300 cl. Got it , charged very little every month paid it off , in June got a credit increse to 700. Also got offered a platinum mastercard w/500 cl from Credit One . I also had my husband add me to his Capital One credit card w/ 1000 cl. As of July 15 my score is 556. Not ideal but every week I check with Credit Karma and my score is going up . It takes time but you have to be disciplined . My name added as a user on hubbys card and my new credit card has now shown up yet on my credit so Im hoping for a decent jump when it does . As far as old collections , I paid off a 1700 Fingerhut bill and it had no effect on my credit whatsoever , I really wish I hadnt paid it , it says paid but still shows as derogatory. Tommorow I am going to my bank and getting a 500 secured card . As you can see I started this quest in December 2014 when I decided it was time to take responsibility and do something and its been 8 months and my credit score has jumped about 135 points .
The FCRA section 605(c)(1) states; The 7-year period… shall begin, with respect to any delinquent account that is placed for collection (internally or by referral to a third party, whichever is earlier), charged to profit and loss, or subjected to any similar action, upon the expiration of the 180-day period beginning on the date of the commencement of the delinquency which immediately preceded the collection activity, charge to profit and loss, or similar action.
Omo says that reducing what you spend at restaurants could have a dramatic effect on your finances. "I had a client, a single person, who spent almost $900 a month on food, and the majority of that was eating out. [By] working with this person, I was able to get them to reduce that number by almost 50 percent and put that difference in paying off debt." Plus, in recent years, restaurant prices have been consistently climbing from month to month, according to the Consumer Price Index.
Yesterday, Margot used Card #3 to buy an $800 flat-screen TV. Although she only used 8 percent of her total credit limit of $10,000, she charged 80 percent of Card #3’s $1,000 limit. While it’s not an exact science, making an effort to even distribute expenses will likely help your score. Next time Margot wants to spend $800, she should take advantage of Card #2, which would only charge 16 percent of its limit. Utilization can be a friend or foe—practice some planning and let this credit repair component work for you.
If you are unable to get a credit card, consider applying for a secured credit card instead. You need to provide a deposit, and you will be given a credit limit that is tied to your deposit amount. A secured credit card is reported to the credit bureau and can help you build your credit score. You can shop for the best secured cards at sites like MagnifyMoney and NerdWallet.
Conduct some research on attorneys ahead of time. Read reviews online and consider meeting with more than one attorney in your area. Your bankruptcy attorney will help put together the forms required to file Chapter 13. This includes a bankruptcy petition, debt and income schedules, and a Chapter 13 repayment plan you have worked on with your attorney to create.
If you are a careful money manager who fell into debt because of unusual circumstances (medical or veterinary  bill, loss of employment or some other emergency) and NOT because you spent more on your credit cards than you could afford to pay off each month, then leave the accounts open. Doing so will help your credit score, because the amount of revolving debt you have is a significant factor in your credit score. Just be sure to put the cards away. Don’t use them while you pay down your debt consolidation loan.
Credit scoring companies analyze consumer credit reports. They glean data from the reports and create algorithms that determine consumer borrowing risk. A credit score is a number that represents the risk profile of a borrower. Credit scores influence a bank’s decisions to lend money to consumers. People with high credit scores will find the most attractive borrowing rates because that signals to lenders that they are less risky. Those with low credit scores will struggle to find credit at all.
If you have one of those letters we mentioned earlier that details your credit problems, you have some idea of what’s holding you back. Even though it may seem complex, as we mentioned, your credit score is based on five core factors: payment history, credit utilization, the age of credit accounts, mix of credit accounts and history of applying for credit. They’re not equally weighted, and this information will most likely vary between credit bureaus.
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