If your average monthly income for the six-month period leading up to your bankruptcy filing is less than the median income for the same-size household in your state, you automatically qualify. If your income is above the median, you must pass an additional means test that compares your income to specific monthly expenses to prove you have little to no disposable income.

To see any major or fast credit repair, try to balance your credit utilization. In the credit industry, there is something known as the sweet spot, which we covered above. The goal with this tip is to get your credit utilization into this category, or 25%-45%. So, we highly suggest creating a game plan by setting aside all your debt and categorizing in terms of priorities. Ask yourself the following questions:
Yossi has truly been a blessing in my families life he has helped my whole family. He helped my wife and I come from the low five hundreds to the high seven hundreds. Because of Yossi and credit repair we have bought three cars brand new and this year we are working on buying a house with his help. I truly recommend him for all who are looking to have someone on your side who truly cares about helping you have the finer thing in life.
The right way: You should expect some fees, but avoid excessive fees when you consolidate. You don’t want to make your journey out of debt any steeper than it has to be. It’s worth noting that a debt management program has fees, but they get set by state regulation. They also get rolled into your program payments, so you don’t actually incur an extra bill.
How it works: You can add your teen as an authorized user to your account by logging in to your online account or calling the number on the back of your card. The information required typically includes their name, birthday and SSN. After adding your teen as an authorized user, they will receive their own card that is linked to your account. They can use their card to make purchases just like you would.
How to use it effectively: The money you withdraw from your 401(k) loan should go directly to paying off your credit card debt. After your debts are paid off, payments most likely will be taken from your paychecks until your loan is repaid. If not, continue to make regular, on-time payments. While you’re repaying your loan remember to keep your job — don’t quit and avoid any actions that may lead to your dismissal so you aren’t subject to penalties.
There’s a way to boost your credit score that doesn’t involve paying down debt or any of the other more traditional score boosting tactics. Since credit scores are determined, in part, on the difference between your credit limit and the amount of credit you use, ask for a higher credit limit. Your chances of increasing it are likely better than you think. Of those who apply for a higher credit limit, 8 out of 10 are approved, according to a recent Bankrate Money Pulse Survey. While it helps to be over 30, odds are good for all adults. To avoid having your credit diminished by asking for a higher limit, ask for the highest credit line increase that won't trigger what's called a hard inquiry. (See also: Credit Score: Hard vs. Soft Inquiry.)
as I have 3 small debits for under $150 each for medical & 2 that are for the court (MUNICIPAL) that are about $1000 in total. so with everything I have a debit of about $1500 total that is killing my credit. was wanting to get a $1000  fixed interest rate Secured credit card at about 5.99%-8.99%. & start paying off Debit, killing 2 birds with one stone. instead of just paying the debit with cash, use a low interest Secured credit card. paying about $200 month then leaving a low balance of $25 on card to continue to get credit once debits are paid in full.
If you have missed multiple payments, perhaps its time to set-up payment reminders. In the digital age, you can schedule your cell-phone, laptop, and even email to remind you when a payment is due. On top of this, you can purchase sticky notes and post them around your entire home or office to remind yourself when a specific bill is due. In a lenders eyes, there should not be an excused for a missed payment. Just like the example of lending money to your friend, a lender is expecting to receive their capital back in a timely manner.
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So, the first thing you should do is assess the damage by looking at a current credit report issued from one (or all) of the three major credit bureaus. Under the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act, every American has the legal right to receive one free report from each one of the companies per year, which will save you some money on processing fees. You can get access to each one at the site annualcreditreport.com.
The best way to handle this is first pull your credit reports from the three major credit agencies – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion.  And this can be done free of charge once every 12-months through the site AnnualCreditReport.com. Go through each of the reports as thoroughly as possible looking for any inaccuracies, like – incorrect information on collections, judgments, balances, new accounts, and payment history.
Your best bet is to call and ask to see if they can put you on a payment plan where you can afford to pay them (even if it’s just the bare minimum a month) or if they will possibly settle for less money. A tip: anything that has your name attached (banking account,utility bills, credit cards, anything you finance, student loans, medical bills, car loans, home loans, your apartment, etc) that you miss a few payments on or don’t pay at all can be reported to the credit agencies and sold to collections companies.
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