I would disagree with this option, as a credit analyst its my job to investigate credit and determine customer eligibility for loans etc... typically creditors do not look for a card thats been used 1 time for $15 then never used again this kind of credit is disregarded and or not taken seriously. When we look to approve a consumer we look at several factors and what that makes a large impact is how they make their payments, the balance currently on all their revolving and installments and the history of payments. if you only charge a tiny amount and pay it off its going to show no history and therefore not be a heavy influence. in fact if you can handle it it is good to sometimes charge the card near max but then pay it off super fast. yes this well temp drop score however. it will show creditor your applying for that you can handle larger amounts and that you pay them down good and fast. 

Nice Info, Well I did boost my score with the help of Patchupcredit@ Gmail com. I had my credit history smiling, my debts and bad collections were deleted in few days. I’m happy living with benefit, I can’t get rid of my credit cards lol. I really appreciate the help i got all for a few bucks i totally recommend his service for you who need to boost your score fast for a loan or something useful


How it works: You can add your teen as an authorized user to your account by logging in to your online account or calling the number on the back of your card. The information required typically includes their name, birthday and SSN. After adding your teen as an authorized user, they will receive their own card that is linked to your account. They can use their card to make purchases just like you would.

If you have one of those letters we mentioned earlier that details your credit problems, you have some idea of what’s holding you back. Even though it may seem complex, as we mentioned, your credit score is based on five core factors: payment history, credit utilization, the age of credit accounts, mix of credit accounts and history of applying for credit. They’re not equally weighted, and this information will most likely vary between credit bureaus.
Consolidating credit cards and leveraging low balance transfer offers has the potential to increase your credit score. But to accomplish this, it’s important to follow a few pointers. For example, for the general population, 30 percent of the FICO® Credit Score is determined by “credit utilization,” which is the amount of credit actually being used.1
Some folks swear by setting automatic payments using their bank’s online bill-paying system or their creditor’s automatic-payment system. If you prefer more control, at least sign up for automatic payment alerts from your lender, via email or text. Then set up a place in your house where you always pay bills, and get an accordion file that enables you to arrange the statements by due dates. Be sure to time your payment so the check or electronic funds transfer will arrive on time.
With poor credit, you may not be able to get approved for new credit products like credit cards. Although you may still be able to take out an auto loan or a mortgage, you’ll pay a much higher interest rate because of your low credit score. Compared to a borrower with good credit, someone with poor credit can pay $50,000 more in interest on a mortgage. Over an entire lifetime, you could end up paying over $200,000 more in unnecessary interest just because of bad credit.
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