Traditional debt consolidation companies review your debts, income and credit score. If you qualify for a debt consolidation loan, they will discuss terms with you which will include the repayment period, the interest rate and the monthly payment. After you are issued a check, you will pay off all of your individual credit cards and owe one monthly payment to the credit consolidation company. One of the downsides of working with a traditional debt consolidator is that your credit card accounts are open and available for use. You may be tempted to continue using your cards and could wind up doubling your debt. Consider the following tips if you decide to work with a traditional debt consolidation company and take out a brand new loan:
Great advice! There is only one issue and I am honestly hoping this is just an unclear explation because I would be quite surprised that you got this wrong considering your line of work... Once a debt is charged off, it stays charged off. It can not be "re-activated", "re-aged" or "re-" anything. The law states that the Statute of Limitations (SOL) is fixed at the point which the debt is charged off and it stays the same no matter what. This won't change your credit score unless you can have that line of information removed from your credit report. A charged off debt stays a charged off debt whether you are paying on it or not.
If the debt is due to drop off of your report in the next several months because it is almost seven years old, consider waiting until then to pay it, as it will have no affect on your score once it disappear. If the debt shows as written off but will still show on your credit report for longer than a few months, collect all of the funds together to completely pay it off before making contact with the lender. That way, you will potentially re-activate the debt but will also show payment in full, which will minimize the damage to your score.
The payment amount and duration are not based on what it would take to pay off the full amount of the debt, but are instead based on calculations determined by the income of the filer, their discretionary income, their assets and their debt. Instead of forcing the debtor to tackle the full amount of their current debt at its current interest rates, Chapter 13 gives a debtor the opportunity to pay off a percentage of the debt based on what they can afford to pay over a three- to five-year period.
The best way to handle this is first pull your credit reports from the three major credit agencies – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion.  And this can be done free of charge once every 12-months through the site AnnualCreditReport.com. Go through each of the reports as thoroughly as possible looking for any inaccuracies, like – incorrect information on collections, judgments, balances, new accounts, and payment history.
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If the debt is due to drop off of your report in the next several months because it is almost seven years old, consider waiting until then to pay it, as it will have no affect on your score once it disappear. If the debt shows as written off but will still show on your credit report for longer than a few months, collect all of the funds together to completely pay it off before making contact with the lender. That way, you will potentially re-activate the debt but will also show payment in full, which will minimize the damage to your score.


SoFi has taken a radical new approach when it comes to the online finance industry, not only with student loans but in the personal loan, wealth management and mortgage markets as well. With their career development programs and networking events, SoFi shows that they have a lot to offer, not only in the lending space but in other aspects of their customers lives as well.
The Capital One® Secured Mastercard® is another option for those who want to strengthen their credit score. This card offers a potentially lower minimum security deposit than other cards, starting as low as $49, based on creditworthiness. Be aware the lower deposit is not guaranteed and you may be required to deposit $99 or $200. You can deposit more before your account opens and get a maximum credit limit of $1,000.
Once you've paid down the balance of your credit cards, keep your spending on these accounts down. You should aim for a balance that is less than 30% of your credit limit on the card. Don't voluntarily lower credit limits; this can hurt rather than help your FICO® Score. If your credit report doesn't reflect your actual credit limit, make sure your credit card company updates this information with the credit bureaus. In addition to limiting your spending on the accounts you already have, be cautious when any new accounts and don't cancel any old accounts since these help your credit score by demonstrating a longer credit history.
There is no magic ratio that is “good” but generally if your balances on any of your cards start creeping above 20 – 25% of your available credit, you may see an impact on your scores. Have you checked your credit scores to see how this factor is impacting your credit? Here’s how to check and monitor your credit score for free. As for the new account, it may have an impact on your score but usually for most people that levels out once the bills are paid on time for a few months. If it will save you a good chunk of money it may be worth it!
Although the number of bankruptcy filings since 2005 seems high, not everyone decides to file bankruptcy to deal with their financial issues. There are other options for consumers who find themselves unable to pay off their debts and facing multiple collections actions, and those other options might be a better choice for some consumers. These options include:
Credit scores are calculated from your credit report, which is a record of your credit activity that includes the status of your credit accounts and your history of loan payments. Many financial institutions use credit scores to determine whether an applicant can get a mortgage, auto loan, credit card or other type of credit as well as the interest rate and terms of the credit. Applicants with higher credit scores, which indicate a better credit history, typically qualify for larger loans with lower interest rates and better terms.
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Sometimes you fall into debt due to unexpected expenses that may arise from medical issues or other events. An emergency fund can be a great way to provide yourself with a safety net in the case of unexpected expenses that may otherwise put you in debt. It’s up to you how much you put into an emergency fund, but keep in mind it should be somewhat easily accessible so you can quickly withdraw it to pay bills before they become past due.
Your best bet is to call and ask to see if they can put you on a payment plan where you can afford to pay them (even if it’s just the bare minimum a month) or if they will possibly settle for less money. A tip: anything that has your name attached (banking account,utility bills, credit cards, anything you finance, student loans, medical bills, car loans, home loans, your apartment, etc) that you miss a few payments on or don’t pay at all can be reported to the credit agencies and sold to collections companies.
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