There are two main ways to dispute errors on your credit reports – you can either do it yourself, or you can hire a professional credit repair firm to handle it for you. If you’re situation is such that you’re in need of quick credit repair, the credit repair firm is probably the way to go. They would have in place procedures for effectively challenging, communicating, and monitoring the removal of incorrect information. If you were to do it yourself, you would have to go through the learning curve of putting that all in place, and knowing how to get the results you desire.
I know this post is nearly three years old but I was desperately trying to figure out how to raise my credit score a little faster than usual. I would just like to say that everything he posted I tried and it worked for me. I have raised my score 50 points in just one month! I still have a long way to go, but now that I know what to do, I see it only going up from here.
Credit repair is critical to saving money on insurance, loans, and credit cards, but that's not the only reason to repair your credit. A better credit score opens up new employment opportunities, even promotions and raises with your current employer. If you dream of starting your own business or just want the security of knowing you can borrow money when you want to, you should repair your credit sooner rather than later.

A secured credit card, in particular, is the ideal tool for rebuilding credit. They offer nearly guaranteed approval because you’ll need to place a security deposit that will double as your spending limit. Secured cards are also far less expensive than unsecured credit cards for people with bad credit. And you can’t tell them apart from unsecured cards on a credit report.
You have no real property and want to discharge your debts. While Chapter 13 bankruptcy requires you to reorganize your debts and pay them off, Chapter 7 bankruptcy allows you to discharge debts completely. For that reason, bankruptcy attorney Barry J. Roy of Rabinowitz, Lubetkin & Tully LLC in Livingston, N.J., said Chapter 7 makes sense when you don’t have many assets but desire to discharge your unsecured debts.
Many credit card issuers will allow you to transfer money to your checking account. Or, they will offer you checks that you can write to yourself or a third party. Check online, because many credit card issuers will let you transfer money directly to your bank account from your credit card. Otherwise, call your issuer and ask what deals they have available for “convenience checks.”
If you are facing financial difficulties, it's always best to contact your lenders, creditors or service providers (such as your utility company or physicians) as soon as possible. Collection agencies and legal fees cost lenders a lot of money, so they are often open to negotiations, which are free. Call, email or write to explain your financial situation (for example, if you have experienced a job loss or unexpected set of expenses due to medical emergency). Discuss a new payment plan and make a good faith payment. At the least, you might be allowed to skip a payment without penalty or lower your minimum payments.

If you have missed multiple payments, perhaps its time to set-up payment reminders. In the digital age, you can schedule your cell-phone, laptop, and even email to remind you when a payment is due. On top of this, you can purchase sticky notes and post them around your entire home or office to remind yourself when a specific bill is due. In a lenders eyes, there should not be an excused for a missed payment. Just like the example of lending money to your friend, a lender is expecting to receive their capital back in a timely manner.
While the steps above may seem lengthy and cumbersome, debt management plans exist because some consumers are simply unable to get out of debt on their own. Bruce McClary, vice president of communications for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC), said that an array of circumstances can lead to situations where families need outside help. Job loss, chronic overspending, reduction in work hours, loss of income and unexpected major expenses are often the biggest culprits when consumers spiral into debt they cannot control.
Our process gets an average of 75% of the items we challenge deleted within the first 6-9 cycles/months, after that we see about 1 item per cycle deleted. throughout the process we see several months with nothing deleted. Most of our clients are usually pretty close to being able to qualify for a mortgage within just 1 year. If you ask me that’s pretty quick.
This is incorrect.You cannot decide when to take the secured deposit back-only the credit card issuer can do this.Also, shredding a card is a bad move as creditors will lower your credit limit or even cancel your card if it is not used somewhat regularly.The end result of this will be one less line of credit and a lower credit limit (which can make it harder to keep your utilization low),thus resulting in a lower credit score.
The first step and tip that we can offer anyone interest in fast credit repair is to look at their credit report. This single document contains so much information that it’s quite easy for there to be minor mistakes, and even major mistakes. With that being said, take the time to receive your annual free copy of your credit report and analyze the entire document. Look at your address, previous loans, and even inquiries to see if everything is truthful. When it comes to inquiries, they should not be posted for more than two years. If there are any inquiries longer than this, they should be removed. In any case, if there are any discrepancies, credit holders have the power to file a claim to remove the falsified information. In many cases, through doing this, it can significantly improve your credit score.
Rebuilding your credit history can take anywhere between a couple of months and a couple of years, depending on the extent of the damage. If your score is damaged because you have lots of debt, missed payments in the past or because you went through a bankruptcy, the improvement process will likely be measured in years. After all, negative information remains on your credit report for seven to ten years, and you can’t fully recover until it’s gone. You may escape the “bad credit” range well before the negative information gets removed, though, by offsetting the negative information with positive developments. You can learn more about how long it takes to rebuild your credit, and you can find some additional tips on how to speed up the process at: https://wallethub.com/edu/rebuild-credit/19613/.
Some folks swear by setting automatic payments using their bank’s online bill-paying system or their creditor’s automatic-payment system. If you prefer more control, at least sign up for automatic payment alerts from your lender, via email or text. Then set up a place in your house where you always pay bills, and get an accordion file that enables you to arrange the statements by due dates. Be sure to time your payment so the check or electronic funds transfer will arrive on time.
Our last tip for fast credit repair that we are going to talk about is about removing any financial dependencies with individuals with poor credit. If you are currently tied by a car loan, mortgage, credit card, or any other line of credit with an individual that has poor credit, this can most certainly impact your credit score. On top of this, if you are planning on co-signing or being a guarantor for an individual, both will impair your credit score as well. It has been proven by financial experts and gurus that, through cutting any bad financial connections with other people, it can be one of the fastest ways of credit repair. We do advise to make this decision carefully as it can easily cause turmoil between two people.
I am a mortgage officer at a community bank. Knowing the importance of credit I have been helping my daughter to rebuild her credit over the past 11 months. Payment history makes up 35% of your credit score. If you have late payments -a good payment history takes time to rebuild! When I started working with my daughter her credit score was 533 due to late payments on her student loan and a medical collection of $135. I am pleased to say her current score is 754! You may ask how could her score be increased over 200 points in less than a year?
Trying to get a little bit of business advice, hope someone can help. We are struggling to make it through our slow months right now. We have about $100,000 in business debt currently active and all in good standing, we have never made a late payment. But we are getting buried with making sure we are paying all of these bills on time while still being able to order products to keep the business fully functional. We are scared we are heading towards bankruptcy or even closure. Would a debt consolidation company be able to help us? Or does it seem we are too far gone? I guess I was hoping with a debt consolidation company we could lower our monthly burden, stretching out our payment to 48-60 months.

This deal is easy to find – Chase is one of the biggest banks and makes this credit card deal well known. Save with a 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months and Intro $0 on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. After that: Either $5 or 5%, whichever is greater. You also get a 0% Intro APR on Purchases for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers, and $0 annual fee. After the intro period, the APR is currently 16.74% - 25.49% Variable. Plus, see monthly updates to your free FICO® Score and the reasons behind your score for free.’
If you've already used up your free credit reports for this year, you can order your credit reports directly from the credit bureaus for a fee. The bureaus all offer a three-in-one credit report that lists all three of your credit reports side-by-side. The three-in-one credit report costs more than a single credit report, but less than the combined price of purchasing your individual credit reports.
I was wondering if you could give me a little advice to help raise my credit score within 5-6 months. I have recently paid off all of my collection accounts and was told to get at least two secured credit cards, as I do not have any active credit. The only active credit that I have is my student loans because I am in school all deferred until 2018& 2021, current car loan which I pay on time and a credit card from my credit union (that I pay on time) but it only reports to one bureau (Equifax), bummer!! About a month ago a mortgage broker pulled my credit and my lowest score was about 540 the highest was 590, and he said I needed to increase my score but didn't say how (no advice given). Since having my report pulled I have paid off the collections and have obtained 2 secured credit cards. My credit cards have not been reported to my credit report yet and all of the paid collections have been updated so I'm not sure what my scores are as of know. I am looking to be able to be approved for a home loan in the next 5-6 months with good interest rates. Can someone please give me advice that can possibly help me to raise my score about 80-100 points in this time frame?  Also I would like to say that there is a lending company that will give FHA home loans with a credit score of 580 credit score in my area, but not sure if their interest rates are ridiculously high. Would going with this company be a good option? 
While credit building loans can be a key step in establishing a strong credit history, it’s imperative that you make all of your payments in full and on time. When you are committed to building a strong financial future with personal budgeting and spending discipline, successfully paying off a credit builder loan can lead to approval for good rates and terms on mortgages, auto loans and other loans in the future.
There’s a way to boost your credit score that doesn’t involve paying down debt or any of the other more traditional score boosting tactics. Since credit scores are determined, in part, on the difference between your credit limit and the amount of credit you use, ask for a higher credit limit. Your chances of increasing it are likely better than you think. Of those who apply for a higher credit limit, 8 out of 10 are approved, according to a recent Bankrate Money Pulse Survey. While it helps to be over 30, odds are good for all adults. To avoid having your credit diminished by asking for a higher limit, ask for the highest credit line increase that won't trigger what's called a hard inquiry. (See also: Credit Score: Hard vs. Soft Inquiry.)
Even if the debt has passed the SOL in your state for suit (variable by state) and even the federal SOL for reporting (roughly 7 years from when the debt discharged) a collector may still pursue you for this money if you owe it. They will just never be able to collect it or report it if you don't allow them to, although they will certainly try and hope you are ignorant enough of the law that they get money from you.

If you are unable to qualify for a balance transfer deal or personal loan that makes financial sense, and you prefer to not touch any of your assets, you may want to set up a chat with a reputable credit counseling firm to see if you are a good candidate for a Debt Management Plan (DMP). A DMP can make it easier for you to pay your credit card bills, but it will likely have a negative impact on your credit score.
If you are juggling multiple credit card bills, you may benefit from the convenience of having one consolidated monthly payment. Consider all of the bills that the modern household pays (mortgage/rent, utilities, cell phone, cable, internet, etc.).  Adding 5-10 monthly credit card bills can overwhelm your bill-pay. Multiple payments are due every week. Going on vacation or having a hectic few days can result in several late payments and hundreds of dollars in fees.
A third of your overall credit score is based on the credit utilization ratio across all of your cards. Because of the way credit scoring works, it's better to carry a $1,000 balance on a card with a $5,000 limit (20% credit utilization) than to carry a $500 balance on a card with a $1,000 limit (50% credit utilization). That's why, in discussing payment pecking order, we recommended paying off the cards closest to being maxed out. That's also why you shouldn't terminate accounts. It'll increase the percentage of total available credit that you’re using – and that will reduce your score.

Authentic credit repair experts and companies owned by individuals who believe in doing something the right way when they put their name on it still exist. Taking a few minutes to find the time to locate genuine credit restoration specialists may be involved but it almost always easier than dealing with a fast credit repair decision made too quickly. Almost everything worth having requires a little bit of wait time – even in today’s world.

Omo says that reducing what you spend at restaurants could have a dramatic effect on your finances. "I had a client, a single person, who spent almost $900 a month on food, and the majority of that was eating out. [By] working with this person, I was able to get them to reduce that number by almost 50 percent and put that difference in paying off debt." Plus, in recent years, restaurant prices have been consistently climbing from month to month, according to the Consumer Price Index.

Sometimes you fall into debt due to unexpected expenses that may arise from medical issues or other events. An emergency fund can be a great way to provide yourself with a safety net in the case of unexpected expenses that may otherwise put you in debt. It’s up to you how much you put into an emergency fund, but keep in mind it should be somewhat easily accessible so you can quickly withdraw it to pay bills before they become past due.
After getting approved for refinancing, the new loan may be reported to the credit bureaus, which could lower your average age of accounts. Your other loans will be paid off, but they could stay on your credit reports for up to 10 more years. Your overall installment-loan debt will stay the same, and as long as you continue to make on-time payments, your score may improve over time.
The best way to consolidate debt is to consolidate in a way that avoids taking on additional debt. If you're facing a rising mound of unsecured debt, the best strategy is to consolidate it through a credit counseling agency. When you use this method to consolidate bills, you're not borrowing more money. Instead, your unsecured debt payments are consolidated into one monthly payment to the agency, which in turn pays your creditors each month. Your credit counselor works with your creditors to try to reduce your interest rates and eliminate extra fees, like late charges or over-limit charges.
Rapid rescoring is a little-known strategy explained by credit guru Liz Pulliam Weston in her book, "Your Credit Score: Your Money and What's at Stake." Unlike credit repair services, which are almost always a scam, rapid rescoring is a legitimate way to improve your credit score in as little as a few hours – if there are verifiable inaccuracies on your credit report. For rapid rescoring to work, you must have proof that negative items on your credit report are incorrect.
You have a low score, so I’m going to guess you have some charged-off, unpaid or seriously delinquent accounts on your credit report. The damage to your credit score has already happened. What you can do initially is make sure the negatives reported on your credit file are accurate and not out of date. Look over your credit reports, and dispute any negative items that you don’t think are yours or are more than 7 years old. Once you have ensured your history is accurate, you can work on adding new, positive data.

Once your cards and debts are paid off, will you cancel the credit cards? Sure, you get credit cards with zero balances and no bills out of the loan, but one of the biggest problems with debt consolidation loans is that they do nothing to change the behaviors that got you into debt in the first place. Instead, they add another creditor to your pile, and fan the flames of going into debt to pay off more debt. If you even think you might be tempted to use those cards again after paying them off, or if you're using debt consolidation as an easy out or way to avoid really looking at your budget, it's not right for you. The last thing you want is to take out a loan, pay off your cards, and then charge up your cards again—now you've done nothing but dig your hole twice as deep.


It’s been only a year since I opened my first card last September, and I already have a solid FICO score – 720, the last time I checked.  That’s not a perfect score by any means, but it lands me safely in the “good” credit range, meaning I probably won’t have trouble getting approved for new credit in the future. I still have work to do if I want to get into the “very good” credit category, which starts at 740, according to MyFICO, but for a credit card newbie I’m not disappointed in my progress so far. 

Checking your credit report on a periodic basis, at least annually, is a good way to catch any instances where you might be the target of identity theft – or the credit bureau has accidentally mixed up your history with someone of a similar (it happens more than you'd think). If you are concerned about others accessing your credit report without your permission, you can freeze it, which will limit who can access the information and under what circumstances. If you think you are a victim of identity theft, contact your local law enforcement authority immediately.
If you are unable to get a credit card, consider applying for a secured credit card instead. You need to provide a deposit, and you will be given a credit limit that is tied to your deposit amount. A secured credit card is reported to the credit bureau and can help you build your credit score. You can shop for the best secured cards at sites like MagnifyMoney and NerdWallet.
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